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11/9/2015 2:26 PM
 
Great looking bull. We pack out with the antlers pointing down. The main benefit is a much lower center of gravity, and much easier going through the brush and trees. It also might prevent some idiot from shooting you :)
 
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11/9/2015 5:01 PM
 
Thanks everybody. That kind of stuff is exactly why I was asking. I'm only thinking 50-60 pound at a time if I absolutely have to. I seldom have to pack meat, and even then it's usually for short distances. After surgery on both feet and ankles I figure it's safer to be able to make multiple trips with a little weight on the back and use walking sticks. I used the Umlindi on this year's deer hunt because I can shoot with it on. Couldn't say the same thing about the pack I use for elk. It's really the first time I've gotten to wear it for any substantial amount of time. I'm still a little shocked at how comfortable it was. It pretty well sold me on getting the Ute before next year.
 
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3/12/2016 2:32 PM
 
CTskywatch wrote

[URL=http://s1283.photobucket.com/user/Darmok7/media/hpg/F91B3A8E-34FB-4036-B33B-1F111FEADEAF_zpslu5g71mp.jpg.html]
[/URL]

Hello all, I was just wondering which color pattern this ute is in?

 

Thank

Platypus

 

 
New Post
3/12/2016 3:01 PM
 
Hello everyone, I'll keep this short. But for everyone who has been wondering how the Ute will do on a long-distance hike, well I'm sure everyone who has seen the top notch craftsmanship, and top of the line materials that HPG use to build their products has no doubt.... But we will all be finding out very soon.

I am doing an Appalachian Trail Flip-Flop Thru Hike this year, starting in Harper's Ferry, WV and heading north to Mt katadin, then flipping back down to Harper's Ferry and heading south to Springer mtn, GA. Last year I attempted a NOBO AT they hike, starting at Springer mtn in GA. I was forced to leave the Trail after 700 miles because of a back injury. I was carry very top quality gear, trying to g as ultralight as I possibly could...which included a lightweight black (I won't talk badly about another company on HPGs forums, out of respect for Evan, brook e and the rest of their team) needless to say that the pack I used put SO muchnstrain on my lower back and hips because of its lack of what system (that would make it too heavy right!?!?!) That it not only had to be replaced completely once, it also had to be sent back once to be repaired...which left me paying for a hotel for 7 days and not making any miles. This year is going to different! I have e still kept all of my lightweight, high quality gear.... BUT will be using a HPG Ute pack with a tarapocket and a runners kit bag. The bag is going to weigh a little less than 3 pounds more than my previous pack weighed.. But I believe that I will be more comfortable, have less stress on my lower back and shoulders, and have a better customer sport team to call if I come in into any questions.
All of my gear should arrive by Wednesday of next week, and I will be taking g it on a short 4day 3 night hike thru the Ozarks in N.W. Arkansas to figure out how everything will need to be packed for the Appalachian Trail, and then I will be heading out in mid April to live outnof my Ute pack for 4-6months.

Please follow along with me on my adventure at platypus2016blog.wordpress.com where I will also be posting g gear reviews and there will be a link to my YouTube channel there also (ArkansasAlex)

Thank you HPG for making the type of gear that needs to be on the market,and providing it at very reasonable prices

God bless America
Alex "Platypus" Gauf
 
New Post
3/12/2016 3:35 PM
 
Sorry for all of the spelling errors in my last post, I posted before I proofread it.. I should know better than that.

Alex "platypus" Gauf
Platypus2016blog.wordpress.com
 
New Post
3/13/2016 10:12 AM
 
I think the Ute will make a great pack for the AT.  I consider its weight to be on the high side for such an endeavour, but durability/quality comes at a price.  The ULA Catalyst is considered to be THE long trail pack.  It won't carry the weight a Ute will, its suspension is far less sophisticated, but it is well made and adequate for 40#, and about 40% lighter than the Ute.  Since you have back issues, the Ute's bendable stays may be worth the extra weight for you.
 
New Post
3/13/2016 1:30 PM
 
Take-a-knee wrote:
I think the Ute will make a great pack for the AT.  I consider its weight to be on the high side for such an endeavour, but durability/quality comes at a price.  The ULA Catalyst is considered to be THE long trail pack.  It won't carry the weight a Ute will, its suspension is far less sophisticated, but it is well made and adequate for 40#, and about 40% lighter than the Ute.  Since you have back issues, the Ute's bendable stays may be worth the extra weight for you.

 

 I'm glad you agree about the pack, and you are absolutely correct when you say the ULA (and now I'm seeing a lot of zpacks and the new osprey model) .last year I hikes with two other people, met both of them on the trail (I started off solo, never wanted to have a possibility of having to quit the trail because of someone else, and I definitely didn't want anyone to feel obligated to end their adventure if and when I did. Which would have happened) one of them was a French Canadian, fro. Quebec who had just separated from some sort of armes forces branch (sadly I have no idea what it is called) , he was about 5'6" and maybe 135lbs soaking wet! He carries a military style compartment pack that he had added all sorts of accessories to, his pack weighed over 8lbs by itswlf! And he would eat more than. Me and our other hiking partner combined. (And I'm 6'3" 270lbs, although I got down to 250 when I was near the end of my hike), so his pack would ALWAYS weigh over 45lbs when we would leave a town with a 4-5 day resupply! It was absolutely amazing the amount of weight he carried without every complaining, but I found out why. I wore his pack for a few miles one day (didn't want to mess with his size adjustments too much, so we kept it a short trade) and his pack actually felt lighter and more comfortable than mine did, and mine was around 15lbs lighter! What I found out was the even though his pack was heavier, it was because of the suspension system and quality of materials (don't get me wrong, I know Cuban fiber is an amazingly durable and waterproof material). 

The problem with the UL packs is that when. You do have to pack them a little heavier for whatever reason (maybe your having to carry 7 days if food instead of 3, which a lot of UL hikers do, and they just resupply more often) the packs just aren't made for that type of loadout. And that causes stress points in very uncomfortable and unsafe areas for someone having to carry that pack on their back 12+ hours a day. Evan and I are working together on this idea that if people could just see that a more supportive, and yea slightly heavier pack can be just as effective on a long distance hike. 

  Trust me when I tell you that I know first hand that every ounce adds up when you're carrying it for months and miles on end, but I had a Gregory z55 pack last year, and it just wasn't what it was advertised as being (I later found out that Gregory sold their company to Samsonite, so needless to say that their legendary hiker customer service is no more, if I wouldn't have had such a social media following since I was documenting my hike I wouldn't have got it repaired the first time, and definitely not replaced the second time. I am not bashing Gregory packs, I am just letting people know that the days of their no question asked pack replacement are over) the straps kept ripping in the same spot, and not just on mine,, but on everyone I met that was using a z55 or z65! I will be keeping up with this years trip on YouTube and through my blog ( platypus2016blog.wordpress.com )and will be reviewing all of the HPG as well. I hope some of you keep up with me and the HPG on the trails..and if you make a secret family recipe for cookies.. I will happily review them too, lol.

 

Best wishes, and God bless the USA

Alex "Platypus" Gauf

 
New Post
3/13/2016 2:53 PM
 
Hey Dude,

Good luck on your hike. That is an awesome adventure. My wife and I used to run a hiking/backpacking group in Portland before we moved out to the boonies and did some longer section backpacks on the PCT, but we've never through hiked.

I've reached the point in my life where, thanks to some arthritis and other issues, I'm starting to look at how much stuff weighs before I look at how much it costs, but I'm firmly convinced that the last place to cut weight is on the backpack itself. First, as you've discovered, one of the best ways to make 15 pounds of light weight backpacking gear feel like 30 pounds on your back is to put it in an ultralight backpack.

Second, I've heard of some catastrophic failures of UL backpacks, days away from an exit point. Humping your gear with one intact shoulder strap, or, as I heard of in once case, carried in your arms in a bundle, goes beyond inconvenient and into the world of "safety hazard."

I put your blog in my feedly. Right now all my backpacking is done vicariously, as we're waiting for the baby to get a little older. I'm looking forward to hearing about your adventure.
 
New Post
3/14/2016 9:26 AM
 
Wose wrote:
Hey Dude,

Good luck on your hike. That is an awesome adventure. My wife and I used to run a hiking/backpacking group in Portland before we moved out to the boonies and did some longer section backpacks on the PCT, but we've never through hiked.

I've reached the point in my life where, thanks to some arthritis and other issues, I'm starting to look at how much stuff weighs before I look at how much it costs, but I'm firmly convinced that the last place to cut weight is on the backpack itself. First, as you've discovered, one of the best ways to make 15 pounds of light weight backpacking gear feel like 30 pounds on your back is to put it in an ultralight backpack.

Second, I've heard of some catastrophic failures of UL backpacks, days away from an exit point. Humping your gear with one intact shoulder strap, or, as I heard of in once case, carried in your arms in a bundle, goes beyond inconvenient and into the world of "safety hazard."

I put your blog in my feedly. Right now all my backpacking is done vicariously, as we're waiting for the baby to get a little older. I'm looking forward to hearing about your adventure.

 

I actually had one of those catastrophic failures happen to me last year!  I've already wrote this reply two times and the first time I wrote a masterpiece, telling the entire story...then when I was getting a glass of water my kid did something and it erased it...So then I started again,  with just the promise of telling the story on my blog one day...and my tablet decided to restart for some unknown reason.  So after over an hour and a half of typing  with one hand  (cut 4 fingers on my right hand trying to make a lightweight DIY cooking pot) this is all you're getting.... lol.

 

But thank you for adding my blog to your list, once I get on the trail I've made a personal promise to write something EVERY single day.  Until I leave for the trail it might be every few days, because I have a lot to do to be ready for the hike. I'm hoping my HPG will get here today, but if it doesn'the it should be here tomorrow, and I will do some initial first impression reviews, and I'll put some videos up of my gear list after the last few things get here. I'm also going to be making some DIY cooking pot cozy and a insulated zip lock gallon freezer bag cooking pouch this afternoon, so I'm going to put videos of how to make them up when I get them finished.

God Bless America 

Platypus 

Platypusblog2016.wordpress.com

 
New Post
10/24/2016 11:58 AM
 
* Minus everything that isn't sewn on, plus a little accessory cord for compression (like in the Ute video), weight is just under 2.5 lbs.

* The space between the compression-strap anchors across the back is just wide enough for a Therm-a-Rest Z Lite pad folded into two stacks.

* The stays and framesheet can be easily and quickly removed to roll up the pack and use it as a pillow.

* If you put a canteen holder through the half section of pals nearest the back end of the prairie belt (I tried this to minimize arm-swing interference), the canteen will be difficult to insert/remove.
 
New Post
10/25/2016 8:17 AM
 
[URL=http://s99.photobucket.com/user/shayhill_2006/media/ute_carseat_medium_1.jpg.html]
[/URL]

Took my son with me to drop off the car at the mechanic and walk home.
 
New Post
6/23/2017 11:18 AM
 
Just received my new Ute and have a question about stay insertion. I have watched the video, but maybe I have overlooked something.

I have fully inserted the stays and confirmed they are bottoming out at the very bottom line of stitching, however the top of the stays extend approx 3 inches.

Any thoughts?
 
New Post
6/23/2017 11:35 AM
 
j.barrett.strausser@gmail.com wrote:
Just received my new Ute and have a question about stay insertion. I have watched the video, but maybe I have overlooked something.

I have fully inserted the stays and confirmed they are bottoming out at the very bottom line of stitching, however the top of the stays extend approx 3 inches.

Any thoughts?

 

That's something that happens to a lot of folks when they first get their Ute.  At the top of the webbing stay channels, there is actually a sewn pocket there where the top of the stays are supposed to insert.  Try backing the stays out toward the bottom a bit, then make sure you flex the packbag a bit while pushing the stays back into place.  Kind of "feel" your way with the stay and manipulate it into the sewn pocket at the top of the stay channel.  Hope that helps!

Ken


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
6/23/2017 11:54 AM
 
Alpendrms/Ken,

Thanks for the quick response. I noticed I only watched the product video and not fitting video. I went and watched the fitting video.

Big difference between that video, as well as this review (http://www.itstactical.com/gearcom/packs/hill-people-gear-ute-pack-a-modular-backcountry-platform/) is that my stay channels are sewn on the bottom and open at the top.

To help orient us, l took two photos.

Bottom of the pack, near the waist belt, with finger in contact with stay.
http://imgur.com/a/gMRSq

Top of the pack with stay extending, while bottom of stay is still in contact
http://imgur.com/a/MJCdc
 
New Post
6/23/2017 12:07 PM
 
j.barrett.strausser@gmail.com wrote:
Alpendrms/Ken,

Thanks for the quick response. I noticed I only watched the product video and not fitting video. I went and watched the fitting video.

Big difference between that video, as well as this review (http://www.itstactical.com/gearcom/packs/hill-people-gear-ute-pack-a-modular-backcountry-platform/) is that my stay channels are sewn on the bottom and open at the top.

To help orient us, l took two photos.

Bottom of the pack, near the waist belt, with finger in contact with stay.
http://imgur.com/a/gMRSq

Top of the pack with stay extending, while bottom of stay is still in contact
http://imgur.com/a/MJCdc

 

 

Send me an email to info@hillpeoplegear.com and we'll get that squared away for you. The stay channel was mistakenly sewn shut at the bottom.

 
New Post
6/23/2017 4:51 PM
 

Ah yes...you are exactly right!  That was not supposed to be like that.  If it's any consolation, those mistakes are a true rarity.  The folks at the HPG C2 node will get you fixed up ASAP.  


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
7/27/2017 10:10 AM
 

Any chance of a run of solid ranger green Ute packs? 

 
New Post
8/7/2017 11:25 AM
 
Agreed TSM. I'd jump at a solid ranger or coyote Umlindi. Would love to see some solid color variants come through on these packs. :)
 
New Post
8/7/2017 7:50 PM
 

I'd be all over a solid colored coyote UTE like a chicken on a junebug. 

 
New Post
8/9/2017 5:18 PM
 
I'd like to add a removable lid to the Ute while keeping the top compression straps. Think i have 2 options:

1. Find a lid with pals webbing on top, run the straps through the webbing and keep it compressed.
2. Find a lid that i can attach to the same loops that the straps are attached to. Maybe with double g-hooks if there is such a thing. I would prefer this method.

I'd like a lightweight lid that can be used as a day pack. Has anyone gone through this process? Any suggestions?
 
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