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7/26/2016 4:10 PM
 

I'm preparing to return down to the Peruvian jungle soon and dialed-in my kit for the adventure.  I'm building a class to teach the students I'll have on packing, sleep systems, cooking systems, clothing systems, and having the necessary tools and contingency items for the jungle environment.  Since I was already taking photos of the layout for my students, I figured I would share them here on the HPG Forum as one example of a way to explore the capacity and versatility of HPG packs and components.  In this case, an Umlindi base pack, with a Tarahumara, Recon Belt, and Recon Kit Bag as my additional "containers".  It does show just how much can go in and attach to HPG packs.  I have this load-out set up for 3 full days (2 nights).  I could add a bit more food and take it out to 5 days fairly easily.  I haven't weighed the full load-out, but I am figuring somewhere in the 50 lb. range, especially due to the rope and safety gear.

This is a photo-heavy thread (25 in all), and folks will notice some redundant items and other components that aren't necessarily jungle-specific, like the High Angle Kit (HAK) I will have along.  In the case of the redundant items (med items, fire starters, etc.), these will be used during some of the training, and also in case somebody needs medical aid.  In the case of the HAK, the terrain will require the use of some of it to avoid a bad fall and to allow more efficient movement.  Some of it will also be used for some Helo operations we will be conducting there.  Hope this helps some folks out there for ideas and plans of their own.  As always, questions and comments are welcome!

Cheers!

Ken sends.

Fully packed, minus the rope, helmet, and runners for the High Angle / Helo Ops Kit.


The 'Lindi, Tara, and Recon Belt, with some components.  One thing currently not in the photo is my DeLorme inReach Explorer and the radio I will be carrying.


Recon Kit Bag, all set up.


Everything from the Kit Bag.


Sleep System.  Hammock with bug screen & rain fly, Mountain Serape, Klymit Recon air mattress, and cordage for pitching my fly.

The Mountain Serape is already inside the hammock...ready to go.

Survival Kit and IFAK / Trauma Kit mounted on a Tarainsert.  This will ride in the Tarahumara.  I can then either pull components out and put them in the sustainment pouches on my belt, or detach the Tara from the 'Lindi and carry it docked or undocked with my Recon Belt for side treks.



Cooking & Water Purification System.  Solo Stove with alcohol burner, wind screen with fatwood sticks, and First Need XLE Elite Water Purifier.  I can also set up the stove as a hanging system.

Tools.  My DIY Alpenstöck (broken down for transport), with BD shovel head (latrines, water seep holes, etc.) & my Condor Warlock for camp chopping duties.

Recently picked up a SOLKOA Grip-S survival saw / tool.  I then bought a 7" pruning blade and some hex head files for it.  Going to test out the wire saw capability and the other tools while out in the jungle.  Also added a Work Sharp sharpening device and a KleenBore cloth to keep things sharp and free of rust.  It all fits nicely in a HPG Tool Roll.

Spare medical items and medicines in two Magpul DAKA Pouches.  These will be along as anti-Murphy items, as well as daily use of the anti-malarial prophylaxis.  We'll be giving the students some training on improvised medical techniques out there, as well.



High Angle & Helo Ops Kit.   Static ropes, runners, carabiners (locking and wire gate), gloves, Arcteryx belt with leg loops, & BD helmet with goggles.

Some comfort items for the jungle camp.  Thermarest collapsible pillow & Crazy Creek Hexlite chair, which is wrapped up in my double-sided pack cover (orange & multicam).  The pack cover also functions in a signal role, as well as a rain catch.

Spare clothing.  Patagonia Jungle Uniform, Ex Officio boxers, two pair lightweight Merino blend socks, & a t-shirt for sleeping in.

Rain gear & Crocs for around the jungle camp & in the hammock.  Ultralight Wild Things Tactical Windshirt & Windpants.  These roll up very small & shed rain pretty well.  Also pretty good for taking the chill out of the night or early morning.

Daily wear clothing.  OR lightweight boonie & Bug-out Gaiters, Multicam Patagonia Jungle Uniform with knee pads, netting scarf, & Garmont Jungle Boots.

Enough food & energy snacks for 3 days...more if I stretched it out.

Personal Hygiene Kit.  I may substitute the Dr. Bronner's soap for No-Rinse Bathing Wipes, & change out the toothbrush for my tiny fold-up one, if I can find the dang thing.  Body / foot powder is a must.




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7/26/2016 9:43 PM
 
This thread is awesome, that's a heck of a set up
 
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7/27/2016 4:40 AM
 
Sawyer787 wrote:
This thread is awesome, that's a heck of a set up

Many thanks!  It's all about spreading knowledge here on the HPG Forum.  Welcome aboard.


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7/27/2016 7:52 AM
 
Ken -

I always love seeing your various kit set ups. It is great seeing other people's kits, especially when it is coming from someone with so much experience. Gives me great ideas, and kind of reinforces some of my own kit choices.

Would you mind sharing some more detail on the survival kit that you have mounted on the tarainsert?

Thanks for sharing, and have fun in the jungle!

-J
 
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7/27/2016 8:59 AM
 
GoKartz wrote:
Ken -

I always love seeing your various kit set ups. It is great seeing other people's kits, especially when it is coming from someone with so much experience. Gives me great ideas, and kind of reinforces some of my own kit choices.

Would you mind sharing some more detail on the survival kit that you have mounted on the tarainsert?

Thanks for sharing, and have fun in the jungle!

-J

Thanks, J.  Glad to be of assistance.  

The hard-shelled survival kit is essentially a SOLKOA SUMA Pro (http://www.fast-fire.com/suma-elite-k...), except this one I have has a few items that are different because it was issued to me during my past military life.  Certain items aren't available outside of the SOF world, but the SUMA Elite in the link I attached has pretty much every single thing.  Aside from the SUMA Pro, I am carrying a RapidPure Pioneer Survival Straw Purifier (small blue bag), a couple chemlites, a hank of cordage and small gauge wire, a tube of crazy glue, two cubes of SOLKOA FastFire (small foil packets), a small tin of Überfire, some petroleum jelly cotton balls inside the S&S Precision waterproof container (coyote colored dip can), orange 8 liter waterproof bag (signaling and water procurement), and some packets of Katadyn Micropur tablets.


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7/27/2016 9:58 AM
 
A few questions sir:

1) Are you using any kind of bug spray, etc? If so, what kind?

2) What are those two OD canteens?

3) Full up, what is the weight of that kit?

Thanks.
 
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7/27/2016 10:28 AM
 
El Mac wrote:
A few questions sir:

1) Are you using any kind of bug spray, etc? If so, what kind?

2) What are those two OD canteens?

3) Full up, what is the weight of that kit?

Thanks.

You bet, El Mac!

1) Bug Spray:  The small bottle in the photo that shows the Umlindi with some components around it is Repel 100 (99% & change DEET), and also a small emergency head net from Sea to Summit.  The other small (blue) bottle is sunscreen, which may or may not be needed.  I also have a larger bottle of bug spray called Jungle Juice (also almost 100% DEET), available at REI.  I used Permethrin on my clothing, hammock, gaiters, hat, and pack.  Sawyer brand.  Hung the items up outside, sprayed them down, and then left to dry.  I also use a bit of mint toothpaste on my hammock lines once it is up.  The Izula Leaf Cutter ants don't like it and don't cross over it.  

2) OD Canteens:  These are new ones that a buddy of mine from my past life had made and sent me to test out.  He calls them Ranger Canteens.  The mouth is the exact same size as a standard wide-mouth Nalgene and they hold a quart.  Lower profile than standard USGI or Nalgene Oasis (not as tall).  They still fit in HPG canteen holsters.  These test models are not BPA free, however.  He is in the process of getting the Army to buy them...at least for SOF units.  Once that happens, he will have manufacturing done in the US for Berry compliance, and also have them made BPA free.  I'm going to provide him with some test data based on usage during my upcoming trips to Peru, Paraguay, and South Africa.  Basically, I'll see how well they do and whether I can break them through hard-use.

3) Full-Up weight:  Haven't weighed it yet with all water in canteens and fully packed, but it "feels" in the 50lb 'ish range....inclusive of my High angle Kit.  Not light, but once again...I am taking some redundant items along on purpose (fire, signal, shelter, meds), some contingency items for student emergencies, and some Group Jungle Camp items for more folks than myself to use.


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New Post
7/27/2016 12:56 PM
 
I like the idea of a wide mouth canteen. My source sip tube would fit it.
 
New Post
7/27/2016 1:37 PM
 
snakey3 wrote:
I like the idea of a wide mouth canteen. My source sip tube would fit it.

If my buddy gets them mass produced, I'll be certain to post a link for how to purchase!

 


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7/27/2016 7:51 PM
 
Thanks for the rundown Ken. I've never really seen much use for a survival kit (but that may just be because I've never been stranded and lost in the wilderness without everything except for that kit). It seems like some of the stuff in your survival kit is redundant necessity stuff (like fire, water, light, food procurement), like a back up if your main goes down?

(Also - great repurposing that S&S container! I've only ever seen guys carry their dip in there, but putting tinder in there is an awesome idea.)

Sorry if I'm pestering.

-J
 
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7/27/2016 8:33 PM
 
GoKartz wrote:
Thanks for the rundown Ken. I've never really seen much use for a survival kit (but that may just be because I've never been stranded and lost in the wilderness without everything except for that kit). It seems like some of the stuff in your survival kit is redundant necessity stuff (like fire, water, light, food procurement), like a back up if your main goes down?

(Also - great repurposing that S&S container! I've only ever seen guys carry their dip in there, but putting tinder in there is an awesome idea.)

Sorry if I'm pestering.

-J

J....no worries!  Totally not pestering.  The whole point of this forum is to get folks thinking about different techniques and what they carry in the backcountry...and why.  That's how knowledge gets disseminated.  Yeah...the survival kit really is that "back-up to the back-up".  In the course I teach, we preach a layered approach.  Meaning, each successive layer in your total kit is meant to compliment or augment the one before it.  The small Personal Survival Kit or PSK is intended to get someone through about 24 to 48 hours...if I had to hang a number on it.  The next level would then be the Go-Bag or Sustainment Pack, meant for anywhere between 72 and 120 hours....maybe more dependent on the environment and season.  Another rule of thumb we follow is working versatility and the PACE (Primary-Alternate-Contingency- Emergency) principle into the total kit / load-out as much as reasonably possible.  Also, there's an old saying among Rangers and Special Forces guys from my past life: "Two equals one, and one equals none."  Basically, always try and have a back-up to the primary.  You can get neurotic about it and have a 150 lb. ruck....but if kept in perspective, the saying makes sense.

The other side of that coin is the very minimalist approach....of which I've had some experience with when I used to alpine climb a lot.  Every single ounce is then hyper-analyzed.  Generally, for a long alpine climb at altitude, if a piece of kit or climbing equipment wasn't going to be used at least twice....then it didn't go.  This was even taken down to the point where meals and warm gear were shared for the trip.  Sometimes it works out great and you move nice and speedy, and sometimes you get your butt handed to you when Murphy shows up...often in the form of unforeseen or miscalculated weather.  Or even worse, an accident of some kind where more time than intended is spent on the mountain at altitude.  Lots of stories written over the years that describe such epics and it's all down to your personal choices for what to take at the end of the day.  

Finally, I will carry some more things than I really absolutely need on some of my trips, because I tend to enjoy the whole adventure more if I have most everything I need to make for a comfortable camp, and am prepared to handle emergencies and contingencies.  Spent plenty of time just "embracing the suck" and being miserable.  I'm finally able to get back to actually enjoying the trips to austere locations, while still having a good challenge.


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New Post
7/28/2016 9:18 AM
 
Heck yeah nice setup.
 
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7/28/2016 9:31 AM
 
Paulgus wrote:
Heck yeah nice setup.

Thanks!


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New Post
7/28/2016 3:48 PM
 
I know MC pattern doesn't typically sell well for HPG (although I don't know why), but I must say this load out looks awesome in that pattern!
 
New Post
7/28/2016 4:53 PM
 
zacht wrote:
I know MC pattern doesn't typically sell well for HPG (although I don't know why), but I must say this load out looks awesome in that pattern!

Muchas Gracias!  I still like MC for certain missions and environments.


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New Post
7/28/2016 8:02 PM
 
Thanks for the detailed break down Ken. I almost always carry redundancies on several big things, so I guess it would make sense to to take some of that redundancy and put it into its own mini-kit as a survival module? I normally roll pretty minimalist (I spent a couple years toting ammo for a 240B and I'm a HUGE fan of light weight - this past December I did a 3-day blizzard back pack trip and including food and water I was rocking 35lbs), and my biggest attempt at survival kit is an old Adventure Medical kit I've had for years - I carry it in my bag daily, it takes up no room, and I always throw that, some quik clot, and a SOFT-T in. Anyways, thanks for giving me some food for thought. I'll have to sit down and tinker a bit before my next excursion (once this blasted 100+F heat goes away).

-J
 
New Post
7/29/2016 5:20 AM
 

Good deal.  To reiterate, I am carrying some things in this full kit because I'll be teaching a group of people, so several things will be used by the entire group.  My load-out would change a bit if it were just me by myself going.


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7/30/2016 10:23 PM
 
alpendrms, that is an impressive load out for the Umlindi. I have been using the Ute mostly lately for the volume, but in many ways prefer the Umlindi for its simplicity. I'm curious what your thought process was in Using the Umlindi for such a load over the Ute?
 
New Post
7/31/2016 6:38 AM
 

It's a bit shorter than my Ute, has enough capacity (especially when combined with the Tara), and it's part of my MC package.  I carried my Ute down there on the first trip and it worked great, as you might imagine.  The Ute does just about anything well.  But then, so does the Umlindi....as long as there's enough room.  In this case there is.


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7/31/2016 8:05 AM
 
Ken, do you have any experience with the Tarapocket? I'm wondering how it ocmpares to the actual Tara as a compression panel / extra pocket on the Umlindi. Does the back padding on the Tara make it less than ideal I guess is my question?

Thank you
 
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