Hill People Gear Forums
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralBackcountry bike suggestions Backcountry bike suggestions
Previous
 
Next
New Post
3/31/2017 2:48 PM
 

steamboat....not to hijack the thread, but about those dropper posts!  I know we've discussed this in the past, but I still haven't actually bought one yet.  I am pretty convinced on the benefits...just haven't gotten around to throwing down plastic.  I've been doing a bit of research on them, and I am thinking of either the Crank Bros Highline or the KS Supernatural i950.  I would need a 31.6mm....but not sure whether to go with 125mm or 150mm of travel.  In fact, I am also wondering if my Trek Fuel EX 8 29er would require that I use a specific length seatpost?  Not sure on any of this.  I thought about just PM'ing you about it, but figured there would be benefit for other Forum members to see the data, as well.  Your thoughts?  Also...any other serious bike gurus...please weigh in.

I also thought about going with as wide a tire as I could on my bike, in order to get a bit better traction & floatation in the really loose & muddy stuff around here....but found out from a Trek rep that my bike would not handle anything more than what I've got....2.35.  That's because my bike requires there to be at least 6mm of space between the tire and frame.  Reckon someday I may very well "procure" a second bike...and it'll be a fat one, because those things just interest the Hell out of me.  They just look so fun.

Anyway...thanks for any insight or info.

Ken


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
3/31/2017 6:56 PM
 
Ken, I think it's all good and like you said we're keeping the info out in the open so everyone can benefit. The KS Supernatural is a good choice, although I prefer the LEV model because the cable attaches at the collar instead of at the top of the seatpost. The advantage being that the cable stays stationary, on the SN when the post is in the low position you end up with a big loop of cable dangling off the back that rubs on the tire and has the potential to get snagged. I'm building a new bike for myself now and just bought another KS without hesitation. I'm not sure about the Crank Brothers, every other dropper post they've made haven't been known to be very reliable. The Highline is a totally new design so hopefully they've fixed the problems, but I'm holding off to see how the hold up over the long term. You're a tall guy so I'd say go with the 150mm, that should give you enough seatpost length to get the right height. As long as the diameter is right and the frame is sized right length shouldn't be an issue.

As far as max tire clearance in your frame, the Trek rep said that because that's their spec for clearance, but there's nothing physically stopping you from throwing something a bit wider in. Just keep in mind that you'll be sacrificing mud clearance and may get some tire rub on the frame if you go too big. A 2.4-2.5 will probably fit without rubbing.

"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
New Post
3/31/2017 7:47 PM
 

Well, I took the leap and ordered a KS Lev DX 150mm travel model.  I am hoping to get some more time on my bike this year, so I am very much looking forward to installing it and having some fun trail rides.  If it turns out I hate it, I blame you steamboat Ned!  Lol!  Actually, I have every confidence it'll be a great upgrade.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
4/1/2017 7:42 AM
 

if you live somewhere with steep trails or with flowy trails where you want to get the seat out of the way you will 100% be set up for success with a dropper seat post. Smart move brother and money well spent!!!!

 
New Post
4/1/2017 9:51 AM
 
Haha! Fair enough Ken! My mountain biking coach to people that took his courses he'd offer to buy back a dropper post if a student bought one and decided thay didn't like it. To my knowledge to date he's never had to buy one back from a student.

"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
New Post
4/1/2017 10:35 AM
 
Konaboy1972 wrote:

if you live somewhere with steep trails or with flowy trails where you want to get the seat out of the way you will 100% be set up for success with a dropper seat post. Smart move brother and money well spent!!!!

Yep....a good bit of the terrain around here is like that....plus full of briars and brush over growing the trails, along with roots, rocks, logs, etc.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
4/1/2017 10:38 AM
 
steamboatsystema wrote:
Haha! Fair enough Ken! My mountain biking coach to people that took his courses he'd offer to buy back a dropper post if a student bought one and decided thay didn't like it. To my knowledge to date he's never had to buy one back from a student.

Good deal!  Yep...looking forward to trying it out.  I also ordered a pair of Maxxis Ardent EXO 29 x 2.4 tires...for better floatation, traction, cornering, and sidewall protection around these parts.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
4/3/2017 9:44 PM
 
I may be getting a used Rockshox Reverb dropper from a fellow teacher who races downhill. Not sure if it is a quality piece of gear or not. I got into some rough slick rock and sand while pulling a trapline out in a deep canyon area and could see how a dropper might save a wreck or two when the going gets more vertical.

The following day we pulled another trapline out in some high desert / mesa terrain. Cheyvonne followed in the truck while I rode. GPS said 17 miles of ranch road and sand two tracks from the time we put the bike down. A good workout for the dogs and me.

As a side note, a G19 with T1 RDS and HTG suppressor comes out of the backpack just fine and with 147 GD is a solid 50yd gun on moving targets. Quiet, handy, and hits hard for what it is if you do your part.

Talk is cheap...lets compare fur checks.
 
New Post
4/4/2017 3:47 AM
 

Nice!  Sounds like you sure are getting some use out of that bike...and having fun to boot, Scott!  I don't know enough about droppers to say much on them, but a buddy of mine endo'ed last year on some Quantico trails.  He crashed hard enough to knock himself out (even with a helmet) and ended up with 40 stitches.  He still can't remember part of that day, but feels pretty sure that if he'd had a dropper post he probably wouldn't have crashed at all.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
4/4/2017 11:06 PM
 
The Rock Shox Reverb is okay when it's working, but can be finicky and kind of fragile. For what you're doing.... it'll probably be fine. If nothing else you'll get a feel for if you like having one or not.

"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
New Post
4/11/2017 10:13 AM
 

Suggestions on chain lube for sandy, muddy, dusty environment?

I have used a dry ceramic lube by Finish Line in the past. Also have a bottle of Boesheild T-9. But could by about anything.

Scot or others, next time you are looking for a saddle give the Dual Density (Gel) seat by Serfas a try. The ARS seat I wore out was a huge improvement but this Serfas seat is REALLY, REALLY, REALLY, comfy!


Talk is cheap...lets compare fur checks.
 
New Post
4/12/2017 10:33 PM
 
Boeshield T-9 has worked well for me, but my all time favorite has been Rock N Roll. I've mostly used the blue "extreme" but the gold 'all-purpose" isn't bad either. If you've still got the T-9 I don't think I'd go out of my way to buy something new just because, but Rock N Roll blue would be my suggestion when the time comes. Just make sure to clean the chain really well when switching lubes. Depending on the carrier solvent in one vs another there can be some gumming up of the drivetrain.

"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
New Post
4/13/2017 8:53 AM
 
Do you use or recommend a chain cleaning system or do you do it manually? Suggestions?

Talk is cheap...lets compare fur checks.
 
New Post
4/13/2017 10:27 PM
 
I've always just done it manually, but the cleaners do work well for that once or twice a year deep clean/ overhaul. Any of them from any of the typical bike tool brands will work fine I'd imagine. I can't recommend a specific once since I don't personally use one. Evan, Scot or Ken I wouldn't be surprised if one of them have one they like. I think I just typically replace the whole chain when I feel like it needs to be cleaned that thoroughly, which is maybe once a year in the conditions we usually see around here. But thinking about it some more in your area knowing there's lots of sand, and probably some mud in the right season, something to keep the drive-train clean might not be a bad investment.

"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
New Post
4/13/2017 10:40 PM
 
My old man uses one pretty regularly, I'll ask what he has. Also a set of brushes is handy to have around, old toothbrushes work great. And some with longer and stiffer bristles help get down into the hard to reach places like the cassette and chain rings. You can get a "kit" with chain cleaner, brush, and some type of de-greaser for $30-40. For cleaning the rest of the bike some water and dish soap work great and is cheap and easy, usually earth friendly enough and cheap too.

"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
New Post
4/14/2017 3:30 AM
 

I have one of the Park Tool chain cleaners I use on mine, my wife's, and my daughter's bikes.  I use it occasionally and does a great job.  Re-lube with Rock & Roll brand...Gold is what I think I have.  Also have a Park Tool combo brush and cog cleaner, which helps a lot.  Several years ago, I bought a whole Park Tool bicycle tool kit that comes in a box and has lots of bike-specific tools.  I found that to be more cost-effective than buying tools piecemeal or having to go to the shop for every single thing, especially repairs I can do myself.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
4/14/2017 6:42 AM
 
Thank you both!

We will get the Park Tool chain cleaner and brush kit on order.

What is everyone using for a detergent / de-greaser for the chain? Is Simple Green OK?


Talk is cheap...lets compare fur checks.
 
New Post
4/15/2017 11:34 AM
 
Simple Green works great. Just make sure to dry the chain as best you can and get fresh lube on it to prevent rust (that's assuming you're cutting the SG with water and not just running it straight).

"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
New Post
4/15/2017 7:04 PM
 

Is there a problem running SG straight? Does it "over clean" or is cutting it just being frugal?

We just got unloaded from the maiden voyage or using the bikes to ride into coyote calling stands. Made about 8 stands and probably covered 16 miles. Having walked many a mile into and out of calling stands I am stupid happy about how fast and quietly you can cover the ground and get on stand. The bikes hide easy once you get their and you don't look like a human silhouette lumbering down the track.

I will probably get a Surly 24 Pack Rack for the front fork. Bungy the calling bag to that and sling the rifle with a Viking Tac backpack sling. In my limited experience the simple two point sling can get mucked up quick if the terrain gets sketchy no matter how tight you cinch it down.
 


Talk is cheap...lets compare fur checks.
 
New Post
4/17/2017 10:54 PM
 
Cutting it is just being frugal, if you buy it by the gallon that stuff isn't cheap.

That's great! I'm always a little surprised that even a slow grinding climb on a bike is still always faster than walking. For non-motorized transportation I don't think there's anything out there that beats a bike for efficiency when crossing country.

"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralBackcountry bike suggestions Backcountry bike suggestions