Hill People Gear Forums
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralMake your own canister woodstoveMake your own canister woodstove
Previous
 
Next
New Post
3/20/2013 10:26 AM
 

I have some .004 titanium in 9.5 inch. It works, and is really light in that configuration. The stuff I have is not the best quality, I suspect with good quality you would be fine at .004


http://www.seekoutside.com | sig added by EH... go check out Kevin's stuff!
 
New Post
6/2/2013 7:17 PM
 

 

 

 I just finished my own DIY canister woodstove and am pretty happy with how it turned out.  I started off with a 7" x 9 3/4" stainless steel composting bin, complete with a lid.  My local Walmart did not have anything in stock to source a canister.  I then purchased some SS and steel hardware from the local Lowe's and Home Depot.  

For the legs, I used 1/4" x 5" stainless carraige bolts.  Inside the body of the stove, the bolts are capped using SS teenuts, acting as stoppers / tensioners against the SS wingnuts and washers on the outside.  The legs tension off from the wingnuts on the outside against the teenuts on the inside, to keep the stove stable without making it bulky.  I can back the wingnuts down to the bolt heads and collapse the legs into the body for transport in my rucksack so that it's nice and compact.  

I made a custom damper from a flat 6" one that I found in the heating isle at Lowe's and pounded it into a shape to form against the lid by using a 53 lb kettlebell and a hammer.  Then I drilled holes through the damper to mirror the bottom holes in the lid.  I can adjust how much air is going through into the stove by grabbing the SS cable I attached at the top and rotating the damper to the left or right to either completely or partially cover the holes.  Not sure how often I'll use that feature, but I'm thinking it will be helpful to keep the stove from burning through wood too fast if I want it to just slow burn.  

For the latches on the sides of the stove, I went a wee bit on the fancy side, but I'm happy with how they turned out.  I used the heel cable piece from an old 3 pin Voile Telemark binding and riveted the pieces to the sides.  I used steel slotted strapping for the hooks to attach to and hold the lid in place to keep it sealed tight.  

I then got the Dremel out, cut the hole, and made the tabs like Evan's original pics.  I didn't want to flatten to top of the stove because it would have made problems for me to use the lid that came with the canister.  So instead, I grabbed a piece of heavy gauge stainless steel that my Dad gave me a while back and cut it to fab up a flat cooking surface.  I then riveted that into place after bending the steel to fit.  

Finally, I used a piece of expanded steel as a small surface for the inside of the stove to place the wood on so that the ashes can fall down to below the fire and also allow air to circulate into the fire from below.  The whole complete stove weighs in at 2 1/2 lbs.  

I have a stainless stove pipe, damper, spark arrester, and all other possibles on order from Ti Goat, in order to have a 3" x 9' set-up that will work with my 6 man Seek Outside Tipi once that arrives (finalizing my order with Kevin this week).  I didn't have time today to do a test burn yet, but I'm pretty sure it's going to crank pretty well.  I'll post pics and findings of the test burn as soon as I can over the next few days or so.  

I'm fairly confident that this stove will heat the Seek Outside Tipi very nicely.  Thanks much to Evan and all the other guys who shared their info, pics, and know-how in the prior postings for this stove build.  The info definitely helped me with fabbing-up my own version.  Hope my write up and pics below help anyone else who wants to build one of their own!


forumPoster is not the actual poster. If you are the actual poster, please make another quick post claiming this post. Sorry, too much moderator overhead to change the attribution on this post.
 
New Post
6/2/2013 7:33 PM
 

 The above post is from me (Ken).  The dreaded too-long-in-editing- mode gremlin has struck again!  I also forgot to mention in the above post that I found the composting bin at Target.  It cost $29.95.  A bit more than the canister some are finding at Walmart, but the dimensions of this one are pretty good, and it came with a lid that is definitely usable in the fabrication of the stove.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
6/3/2013 1:48 PM
 

Funny how these homemade stoves take on a personality of their own. After a comment from Angie at SO, I started calling mine the "little pig", and it works. Yours looks like "the spaceship" to me in a steampunk sort of way.

I'll be interested to see how well the pot support works. Conventional wisdom says you won't get much heat other than the very center of it. However, being able to use a lid that comes with something for a door is a major win and worth a little bit less efficient cooking. Just depends how much.

Also interested in the coal grate. The round bottom plus correct vent placement should render that no advantage at all, but you don't know until you try it.

The gratuitous inclusion of your powerwagon in the pictures is just hurtful. It's hard to beat factory lockers, and lockers really do make a difference.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
6/3/2013 3:28 PM
 

 You're right...it does look like some kind of steampunk spaceship contraption!  Hah!  

I thought maybe I could just attach a couple pieces of small box mild steel for pot supports, but it seemed like there would be very little contact that way, too.  The pics are deceiving, but I bent the ss plate so that I could have as much contact as possible with the stove body.  Maybe if I stoke up the fire good and high for cooking, I'll get enough heat transfer to a pot....hopefully.  As a back-up for cooking duty, I can always bring along the folding firebox stove I bought.  That thing cranks for such a little stove.  The downside is that it would have to be used outside the tipi.  

I stuck the coal grate in there in hopes that it would raise the level of the fuel a bit so that the existing vents in the door would be at around the proper height, like what you described in your original posting under Free Resources.  Plus, maybe because the fire will start higher, maybe I'll get the cooking surface to act right.  If the grate doesn't work as planned, I guess I can take it out and drill some additional holes into the lid below the existing ones.  The lid came with holes in a circular fashion going all the way around it and the damper I made covers the upper ones entirely.  When I do my test burns, I'll see how efficient it is and maybe even throw a pot of water on the cook surface and determine boil time with a stopwatch.

Didn't want to hurt any feelings with having my (incredible! :) ) Power Wagon in the pics!  Yeah...I got it a couple years ago and it has been the dream truck for me a long time before that.  I got rid of a '79 CJ-7 (donated it to the Special Operations Warrior Foundation) that I had over $25k invested in.  The PW is basically like a 3/4 ton Jeep.  1 ton axles, lockers, electronic swaybar disconnects, skidplates nose-to tail.  I will have that truck until I die or the wheels fall off, whichever comes first!  It's been a great rig so far.  Had it up to an offroad park in PA last Spring where 13 other Power Wagon owners met up...an actual PW offroad club I'm in.  Four of the guys even drove down from Ontario!  We put them out on probably the ragged edge of what one ought to take a fullsize on....lots of off-camber, deep ruts, rocks, mud, etc.  All of the PW's performed great.  Evan, I think both you and Scot ought to just go ahead and get one!  A fitting vehicle for both the Hill brothers!  Hey!  Maybe you could get Ram Trucks to come out with a Hill People Gear limited edition Power Wagon, complete with the HPG symbol on the hood and tailgate instead of the Ram!  Color options could be Coyote, Foliage, and Ranger.  That would be pretty awesome!  What do you think?  Just sayin'!  

 

 


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
6/4/2013 6:25 PM
 

 I did a test burn today with the stove after I got home from work.  It cranked up and got hot pretty nicely, but I did notice that I had to open up the door every so often to get things burning like I wanted.  If I left the door just partially closed but not latched, it let enough air in to keep the flames perky.  Once enough of a hot coal bed was established, the flames stayed whether I had the door latched or not.  I put exactly 1 liter of water in an MSR pot onto the cooking surface to check how long it would take to boil.  I didn't get an accurate measurement of boil time because I ended up having to open the door and add wood to stoke it up properly.  So, the water got to a rolling boil somewhere between 13-14 minutes.  This was with chunks of hickory in there as fuel.  The stainless cooking plate I attached seemed plenty hot all the way across, so I think it's got enough contact area in that regard.  The jury is still out as to whether the expanded steel grate in the stove was any help or not.  I suppose it helped air circulate from under the fuel like I planned, but not sure if that really contributed that much.  Post-burn and after it cooled, I went ahead and drilled five more holes into the lid below the existing row.  This set of holes will always be open, but I'll still be able to close off the upper set with the damper I fabbed.  I'll do another test burn soon, after I get the stovepipe assembly in from TiGoat.  I'll take some more pictures for that burn.  Either way, I can tell already that it should heat the Tipi I'm getting pretty well.  

Evan, for the stuff sack you are using for your stove, is it some kind of special thing, or just any old garden variety?  Not some heat resistant thing or something?  Once mine cooled, I put it into an old aviator padded bag I had that I used to carry my freefall helmet in.  Might dig out something lighter, but still robust, for it.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
10/21/2013 1:08 PM
 

Great looking stoves here - this thread got me thinking that I really need a heated shelter. I couldn't find this paricular canister at Wally World, but on another forum there was a guy who made a stove out of steam table pans that looked like it would be very servicable. I started to look into these and found some locally that are are made of 18/8 22 gauge stainelss steel, but was wondering are there any hazards associated with using this grade of stainelss steel for stoves? I know that using galvanized steel is a no-no due to zinc fumes, but I have also heard that the chrome and nickle fumes created when welding stainless steel aren't so good for your health either. Is this anything to consider or are the temperatures generated in a camp stove not high enough to create these kinds of fumes when using 18/8 stainless? I'm not very familiar with the appropriate application of differnet kinds of metals, so thanks for any feedback on this topic.

Corey

 
New Post
10/30/2013 2:27 PM
 

 

I took a stroll around Walmart looking for these canisters last weekend. They don't sell them individually anymore. There is a 4 canister set from Mainstay that includes a 6x9 stainless steel canister with a clear lid. Cost was $17 for the set. I guess the plus side is the wife gets three nice canisters for the kitchen!
 
New Post
3/8/2015 10:19 PM
 
Well I'm gonna go ahead and resurrect an old thread.

I'm new to portable wood stove camping, and my big question is about shelter size. Would a large-ish pyramid tent, like the new Seek Outside Cimarron (about 9 x 10 ft) need a bigger stove? I'm shelter-shopping, so this has been on my mind a lot lately. Obviously a bigger stove means more heat for a longer time, so I'm not expecting miracles from a small stove like this one, but I'd hate to do the work putting this together and buying the materials only to immediately want something bigger/better.

In any case, I only learned about HPG recently, and I'm already finding new things to start saving up for. The fact that HPG is right here in Grand Junction is pretty cool too. I kinda feel weird asking this question, since HPS now sells a stove of your own, but I figured it was no big deal since the instructions are still up on the site.

Thanks!
 
New Post
3/9/2015 5:07 PM
 
That canister stove is a great little stove, and the fact of the matter is that if you're handy, building a woodstove (particularly a non collapsible one) is no big deal. As for a 6"x9" canister model -- It will heat a 1-2 person shelter nicely, and take the edge off in a 3 person. Any larger than that and you've outgunned the stove with your shelter size. However, if you start with a larger pot....

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
3/9/2015 9:40 PM
 
Thanks for the advice. Now I've just got to find a canister. They sell a set at Walmart where the largest size is 6 inches diameter and about 8 inches long. It seemed tiny looking at it. I'm thinking something bigger is what I need, so now I'm shopping around.
 
New Post
3/15/2015 2:41 AM
 
Can anyone recommend a canister? I'm thinking the largest canister in the set at Walmart is smaller than the one that was used for the original stove here. I know none of this is an exact science, but I'm thinking the 6 X 9 is the bare minimum for me considering the size of shelter I'm using (a 4 man pyramid tent). I've looked at the compost bins online - they seem like a good size - but I have no idea how heavy they are.
 
New Post
3/15/2015 2:34 PM
 
alpendrms,sir,if you would be of a mind to,would you please start a thread,with pictures too,about your Power Wagon?Thanks.
 
New Post
2/9/2016 10:33 AM
 
I am just beginning this project myself, and I'm curious about SuperBadger's closure mechanism. I am unable to see the photos of his stove in this thread. Would anyone mind posting some photos of a front door that rotates up and out of the way or maybe a description of how they rigged theirs?
 
New Post
2/9/2016 4:05 PM
 
RONK wrote:
alpendrms,sir,if you would be of a mind to,would you please start a thread,with pictures too,about your Power Wagon?Thanks.

RONK....I just now saw this post!  It must have gotten buried among other posts all of this time!

I'm in the middle of teaching a Personnel Recovery Course this week and have several projects going that I need to cover down on....but I'll surely start a thread sometime soon.  Maybe it doesn't need to just be about my Power Wagon (although I am mighty proud of it), but the thread could be for other Forum users to post some of their own vehicle set-ups, too!


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
8/8/2016 5:36 AM
 
alpendrms wrote:

 The above post is from me (Ken).  The dreaded too-long-in-editing- mode gremlin has struck again!  I also forgot to mention in the above post that I found the composting bin at Target.  It cost $29.95.  A bit more than the canister some are finding at Walmart, but the dimensions of this one are pretty good, and it came with a lid that is definitely usable in the fabrication of the stove.

 

On the VERY off chance that you're still on this forum, would you be able to answer a couple questions I have about the stove you made here?
 
New Post
8/8/2016 2:41 PM
 
Arsenul wrote:
alpendrms wrote:

 The above post is from me (Ken).  The dreaded too-long-in-editing- mode gremlin has struck again!  I also forgot to mention in the above post that I found the composting bin at Target.  It cost $29.95.  A bit more than the canister some are finding at Walmart, but the dimensions of this one are pretty good, and it came with a lid that is definitely usable in the fabrication of the stove.

 

On the VERY off chance that you're still on this forum, would you be able to answer a couple questions I have about the stove you made here?

 

Alpendrms is in S. America right now followed quickly by another international trip. Post your Qs and he'll get to you at some point.

 


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
8/16/2016 5:30 AM
 
Don't know when that will be but obviously not in the time I need it. If anything I'm curious about what he used for legs and the cooking plate there. I already have the body of the stove, plan on using a hinge somehow, and the holes will be covered easily. I mostly just struggle with the door right now. His way is simpler but more work and finding parts, so I have to get this hinge to work. Which mostly means bending it maybe.

What are people using to connect the parts to the stove though?
 
New Post
8/16/2016 7:47 AM
 
Arsenul wrote:
Don't know when that will be but obviously not in the time I need it. If anything I'm curious about what he used for legs and the cooking plate there. I already have the body of the stove, plan on using a hinge somehow, and the holes will be covered easily. I mostly just struggle with the door right now. His way is simpler but more work and finding parts, so I have to get this hinge to work. Which mostly means bending it maybe.

What are people using to connect the parts to the stove though?

I'm currently in Paraguay teaching some folks some survival skills.  On a short break between classes, so figured I'd hopefully provide the answers you need.  I used long 1/4" stainless steel carriage bolts for legs, with cap nuts on the ends to extend them to the length I wanted, with wing nuts in between to adjust them in and out.  I made the cooking surface from a flat piece of stainless steel, bent it into shape with a vice and vice grips, then riveted it in place with steel rivets.  My hinges were made from an old pair of telemark ski bindings.  You might look for gate hardware at Lowe's or Home Depot, and choose stainless steel pieces and steel rivets to attach parts, which will put up with the heat generated from the stove.  Also, the door on mine has a rotating circular section, to act as a sort of damper.  I can rotate it to cover or expose more holes for air flow.  Hope that helps.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
8/16/2016 8:58 AM
 
Alright thanks. My main concern is the hinge I'm working on. It looks nice but I'm curious. The hinge isn't completely flush with the bucket but is with the lid. Should I use rivets on the lid and then a bolt and nut for the bucket because they aren't flush? I want to have a hinge like that.
 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralMake your own canister woodstoveMake your own canister woodstove