Hill People Gear | Real Use Gear For Backcountry Travelers
888.464.1875 | info@hillpeoplegear.com Register | Login
Hill People Gear Forums
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsFirearms and Sk...Firearms and Sk...Two pracical rifle videos. Two pracical rifle videos.
Previous
 
Next
New Post
11/14/2016 8:12 AM
 
I came across a couple of videos on the practical rifle that I thought would be interesting to many here.

Rethinking the scout rifle:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-x7N8hLI2yM

Becoming a practical rifleman:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtfmHKQmIoM


I like the idea of carrying a rds in lieu of back up iron sights on a bolt action rifle. I had a Ruger Gunsight Scout with the XS full length rail but the scope height was just too high for me to get a good cheek weld.

 
New Post
11/14/2016 11:09 AM
 
Excellent vids.  Randy Cain is the MAN, but those who've listened to me already knew that :).  How many here have attended Cain's Practical Rifle besides myself and the Hills?  IIRC a few who post here attended Cain's class with the Hills in OR years ago.
 
New Post
11/14/2016 11:17 AM
 
I haven't taken from Randy Cain. Would love to...unfortunately, I don't see a Practical Rifle class listed for '17.
 
New Post
11/15/2016 5:47 PM
 
I saw those the other day, they were really good ones!! I also found a guy that filmed a whole bunch of the Gunsite scout rifle course. I don't know about this guy's channel too much, but he seems to have a passion for the scout rifle, and it's pretty fun to watch the course. Here it is:
Gunsite Scout Rifle Conference Part 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vw1oisRDZFY

 I'm in the process of not-so-patiently building a custom practical rifle, so I'm making things worse by watchin practical rifle stuff on boob-tube :)

 
New Post
11/17/2016 3:39 PM
 
Those first two videos are pretty dang good, and there is a quite a bit I agree with. I quickly got bored watching Yeager shoot, how long has he been a practical rifle guy?

Randy Cain is a phenomenal instructor and I pretty much think if you run a bolt gun for any reason you should take his practical rifle class as it stresses you, your equipment, and forces you to do things you probably wouldn't normally do, all of which makes you a better bolt gun shooter period. I would almost say that for a hunter it should be required as it really shows you the reality of field positions vs accuracy and how you do over the course of a fatiguing day. It also give you a lot of familiarity with your equipment.

The early part of this week I got to spend in VA with Alpndrms and the folks from his day job at a back country skills training week. As part of the tracking training there was a shooting component. For a variety of reasons I decided to take my Remington. More than a few folks were a bit surprised at my choice and a couple even offered to loan me an AR. As we were walking down to the shooting location I was hearing a bit of a rattle, and started trying to figure out where it was coming from. Turns out that when it was recently re-barreled the mounts were not loctited and the rounds I have put through it since then had worked them loose (on me for not checking). The front mount was very loose and the rear was a tad loose. I borrowed a pretty slick multitasker twist from Alpndrms and tightened them, and rather than worry about zero or them working loose I decided to just run my irons. That is one place I differ from the first video. If I was running a red dot as backup, it would have been back at camp as I just had my kit bag. Sure it wouldn't have been a big deal to run back and get them, but the irons where there. I like my back sighting system to be on the rifle. I did end up putting my scope back on for the second run, because bragging rights were involved, and I realized that for the drill my zero would be good enough and I also wasn't worried about the number of rounds shooting things loose. Needless to say my confidence in my skills with a bolt gun as a result of the Cain Class and practice where validated. I wasn't as quick as the AR15 guys (no one else in my team was running a 308 so I don't know how I would have fared there), but I wasn't very far behind. For the purposes of that particular drill there was actually not a disadvantage to the bolt gun in terms of speed if you knew how to make it work. After that the multitasker twist and a bit of loctite sorted me out. The whole thing kind of renewed my appreciation for a bolt gun and my Remington in specific. It is light, handy, powerful (relatively), well setup for a wide variety of uses, and most folks just saw a hunting rifle (until I threw in a 20rder that is). Sure it was a bit more modern looking that a nice wood and blued Model 70, but far less so than a semi of any kind.

In short I think he got it right a practical rifle set up right covers a lot of basis pretty dang well, provided you know how to run it, but I still want irons on the gun or to always have a RDS on it.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
11/17/2016 9:38 PM
 

scothill wrote:
Those first two videos are pretty dang good, and there is a quite a bit I agree with. I quickly got bored watching Yeager shoot, how long has he been a practical rifle guy?
<SNIP>

 

I watched all 7 or 8 of his Gunsite/Savage Scout videos trying to get an idea of the class. Trying to decide where to take my Ruger GSR class, it's between a Gunsite or Cain class. But anyway Yeager hasn't been a practical rifle guy long. I think he said something about never having run a bolt gun like that before he started the class. But to his credit he admitted he wasn't good at it yet and that the practical/scout rifle platform is still a valid concept.

 

 

In regard to sights I agree with what Scot said. I want my back up sights to be mounted on the gun simply because there is no way I can forget or leave them behind or take them out of my bag to save some weight. A red dot on an offset mount is an option but now I'm adding weight and bulk to a rifle that is supposed to be light and handy. I don't know the proper answer, I suppose if you carry your back up sighting system off of your rifle and can know you'll always have the sight should you need it you're good to go, I can't make that guarantee for myself so I want my back ups mounted as solidly as I can.

 
New Post
11/18/2016 6:50 AM
 
scothill wrote:
 

Randy Cain is a phenomenal instructor and I pretty much think if you run a bolt gun for any reason you should take his practical rifle class as it stresses you, your equipment, and forces you to do things you probably wouldn't normally do, all of which makes you a better bolt gun shooter period. I would almost say that for a hunter it should be required as it really shows you the reality of field positions vs accuracy and how you do over the course of a fatiguing day. It also give you a lot of familiarity with your equipment.

 The above bears repeating.  There was a guy in Cain's PR class coming back for the second time when I was there.  He'd gone elk hunting after his first attendance.  He said he had a fleeting shot at a bull, at 200 yd. Couldn't go prone, so he looped/Chinged up and went to sitting and made the shot.  He said he'd have watched it walk had he not had the training.

Cain usually does Practical Rifle in the fall at his range in FL (just north of Tampa)  He typically does one somewhere else (cooler) in the summer.  If you have a range and enough paying customers, he will come to you.

 

 
New Post
11/18/2016 11:00 AM
 
Scothill wrote:

Those first two videos are pretty dang good, and there is a quite a bit I agree with. I quickly got bored watching Yeager shoot, how long has he been a practical rifle guy?


I wasn't suggesting that yeager was a guy to listen to, and I'm certainly not subscribed to his channel, but it was a good way to get a feel of what Gunsite's scout rifle course is, and hear some of the concepts that they (meaning gunsite academy, not yeager) teach.

Thanks for the cool story about your training day, that sounds like some seriously fun training! From what I've read, both on the HPG forum and elsewhere, I agree with ya that Randy's course sounds like THEE practical rifle course to take. I know its gonna be the first class on my list after my rifle's done!
 
New Post
11/18/2016 1:03 PM
 
I was at the class Scot and Evan organized. As TAK says, Randy is Excellent!
 
New Post
11/18/2016 3:41 PM
 
Shrubjr wrote:



I wasn't suggesting that yeager was a guy to listen to, and I'm certainly not subscribed to his channel

 I subscribe to his channel.

 
New Post
11/18/2016 3:42 PM
 
Tell me it isn't so.
 
New Post
11/18/2016 3:53 PM
 
El Mac wrote:
Tell me it isn't so.

 

I like Yeager.  A country cop who found his way to Iraq, nearly gets his azz ventilated on a beer run (heard the tale), makes it home alive and starts a successful training company.  Only in America.  He's occasionally FOS, like the rest of us.  Unlike most, he's got the gonads to say what he believes is right.  No shrinking violet, to say the least.
 
New Post
11/26/2016 1:52 PM
 
I have never trained with Yeager (and don't have any plans to) however I did meet him at an industry party at SHOT a few years ago. I was extremely surprised at how humble and friendly he was. I wonder if part of his online persona is an act.

Nick Boyle | HPG Product Specialist
 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsFirearms and Sk...Firearms and Sk...Two pracical rifle videos. Two pracical rifle videos.


Edward Curtis Canyon De Chelly
When humans first set foot in a new continent, they came in small groups under their own power, bringing only the gear they needed. Most simply called themselves The People. Over time, those who chose the rougher freer life of the up country came to think of themselves as the Hill People.
Hill People Gear