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5/16/2016 8:36 AM
 

What is the interest level in an "intro to backpacking" class in Colorado in mid-August?:

  • Kebler Pass area (photo above is from exact route planned)
  • Structured online coursework prior to event
  • Wide variety of loaner gear available
  • Meet Friday mid day at TH for some course work and gear shake down
  • Camp Fri night at TH
  • Head out on trail Sat morning
  • Mix of on trail and off trail travel
  • Structured and ad hoc lessons along the way
  • Sat night in the field
  • Back at TH by mid day Sunday

Would a location more accessible to the front range make a difference in your decision to go? (doing it in my home stomping ground makes it much easier to properly facilitate, but if it makes a big difference to attendance...)


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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5/16/2016 12:15 PM
 
I'd be in if the cost wasn't prohibitive. Regardless of work schedule, this time. :)
 
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5/18/2016 5:42 AM
 
I would really like to attend this, but fund wise I don't think it will be possible. Damn though. It'd be right up my alley as I'm a learn by seeing kind of person.
 
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5/18/2016 7:34 AM
 
Any details on the type of lessons you plan to cover? Obviously its titled "Intro to Backpacking", but if you have any further details on content, party size, and what attendees should expect to get out of their experience that would be awesome. I think this is a great idea.
 
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5/18/2016 8:36 AM
 
I'd be interested depending on cost as an experienced backpacker in more arid climates.

The excuse to leave Texas and go back to the mountains in August would be mighty tempting.
 
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5/18/2016 12:50 PM
 

Good questions all.

I'll address the most prickly question first. Professional training typically costs 100 - 150 per day. So $200 for the whole thing would be on the low end. On the other hand, we're just getting started with the training division and aren't charging as much until we get things dialed in. The winter skills we didn't charge for the training at all -- just room and board. And we would certainly do some things differently the second go around on that. Primarily, we needed to cut WAY down on the amount of information and shift more to hands on activities. Although winter is quirky on that front - only half the class or less was actually prepared and capable of spending much time outside. For this class this time, I don't see charging more than $200 and it could be less. I'm very open to hearing from folks about what they think. Shuttle service from GJ airport is an option.

Class size would be limited to 10 plus instructor(s).

Topics would include:

  • gear and food selection (during lead up phase - instructor evaluation of individual packing lists, etc.)
  • homeostasis / energy envelope (theory and practical decision making)
  • land nav (fri afternoon class plus hands on - not a full land nav course, but enough to successfully navigate to location)
  • off trail route selection
  • camp site selection and shelter orientation
  • critter awareness (track identification, land usage patterns, spotting, some behaviors)
  • other ad hoc lessons as opportunities present themselves (the mountain is always the best teacher if you're paying attention)

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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5/18/2016 1:41 PM
 

I would certainly be interested in that. Would the "critter awareness" part include tracking?


I'd be even more interested in the winter course since we don't get real winters down here.

 
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5/26/2016 10:52 AM
 

I wish I could be there because this sounds like a great way to spend a weekend. 

 
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7/14/2016 3:17 PM
 

It's on


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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8/16/2016 11:04 AM
 
I've got some questions about the last bits of gear I need to either acquire, or just select for this trip.

I'm asking here so that the discussion I have will be useful to the other guy showing up for the class (although often these sorts of classes get last-minute takers. I know I've done that once or twice).

Anyway, the last critical piece of gear I have to acquire is a water filtration system. Based on what I've read on this forum (get one with a pump) and other places I've reduced my choices to:

The Katadyn Hiker Pro Microfilter https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002CN82V2/

or the MSR MiniWorks EX https://www.amazon.com/MSR-56425-MiniWorks-EX-Microfilter/dp/B000BBF2RY

Anyone have pros/cons? The price difference isn't much, both are more-or-less field serviceable (though I doubt I'd carry a spare filter for a short trip).

Next question, I've got 2 Wiggy's sleeping bags, a 20 Degree bag, and a 40 degree bag. My first order guess is that the 40 degree bag with a poncho liner/woobie will be enough with the clothing I've got along with me. 10 day forecast is showing lows around 40 with highs in the 60s.

Lastly in the videos the recommendation is for Deet based insect repellents, but those tend to have possible negative effects on plastics/polymers. Recently Picaridin based products have hit and the tests look good. Any experience?
 
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8/17/2016 7:45 AM
 

On the filters, I don't have personal experience with either. However, I rely heavily on a filtration system that I can completely disassemble and troubleshoot in the field. To include brushing the ceramic filter every other day or so in some conditions. It looks like the MSR allows for this, whereas the Katadyn doesn't. The Katadyn's "field maintainability" seems to be limited to cleaning the pre-filter which amounts to nothing. Also, I like the large handle on the MSR. On the other hand, this is worth taking a look at: https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/76837/

The sleeping bag question is an easy one -- what is the weight diff between the 20 degree bag and the 40 degree bag + woobie? Go with the lighter system. You're not going to get much utility out of a normal woobie as in-camp insulation so it's nothing more than a sleeping bag liner for you. I'm never OK with a sleeping system that only takes me down to the forecast lows. I like a 20 degree buffer.

Don't have any experience with Picardin. Give it a shot. Deet is very nasty stuff, no doubt. If there is something not as nasty that works nearly as well it's a win. FWIW, the mosquitos are mostly gone out of those mountains now so it's not as much of a risk as a trip into the boundary waters for example.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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8/17/2016 2:53 PM
 
> It looks like the MSR allows for this, whereas the Katadyn doesn't. The Katadyn's "field maintainability" seems to be limited to cleaning 

> the  pre-filter which amounts to nothing. Also, I like the large handle on the MSR. On the other hand, this is worth taking
> a look at: https://backpackinglight.com/forums/t...

In one of the threads you mention: 

https://www.amazon.com/General-Ecology-First-Elite-Purifier/dp/B00AI91958 and that you were going to use that when your current pump went out. Is that still your plan? I didn't see (well I'd read it, but didn't remember) until after I'd posted, but if it's really that much better it's within "budget". 

I'll have to check the weight of the two bags. I'm included to pack the woobie anyway, because security blanket (he says with his thumb in his mouth). 

t's not as much of a risk as a trip into the boundary waters for example. 

Honestly that might be the last time I did any real "backpacking", although it was canoe based. Would have been around 1980/81. 

Even back then DEET didn't stop them. 

 

 
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8/18/2016 8:34 AM
 
I did in fact make the switch to the First Need XLE Elite instead of buying full replacement parts for my older filter. What drove that was the fact that it takes care of not just bacteria but viruses too. That means it protects me as much as possible from what may be in my water sources.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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8/18/2016 6:17 PM
 
This might be the wrong place to post this and if so I apologize and please feel free to move it or delete it. But, the one thing that I really like about the First Need Filter is that you can test it using the dye that comes with it. Now, maybe you can test all filters using dye, I do not know of this is true or not.

On the other hand I also like the light weight and the simplicity of the sawyer squeeze system, but if it freezes you are SOL and have not way of testing it. At least with the First Need you have some piece of mind that it is working.
 
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8/23/2016 12:28 AM
 
I'll be headed down there Friday around one leaving from Wheat Ridge, CO if anyone from the front range needs a ride down, or would just rather carpool.

"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
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8/23/2016 9:21 AM
 
steamboatsystema wrote:
I'll be headed down there Friday around one leaving from Wheat Ridge, CO if anyone from the front range needs a ride down, or would just rather carpool.

 

This would not get a person there early enough for Friday classes.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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8/25/2016 1:34 PM
 

I'm planning on leaving from Buckley AFB area (Eastern Aurora) between 0715 and 0730. 

I'm not 100 percent sure of my route at this point, but WAZE says 4.5 hours to Lost Lake Area.

 
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8/25/2016 1:38 PM
 
And why does this forum display times in BDT/BST?
 
New Post
8/30/2016 10:14 AM
 
petrocc wrote:
And why does this forum display times in BDT/BST?

 

No idea. I've tried, but haven't found the setting yet. Some things about this CMS aren't worth fighting with.

Here's the trip video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5dWMe... 


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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8/30/2016 6:43 PM
 
Dude, that video is awesome. Really makes me wish I could make it out that way again one day. - J
 
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When humans first set foot in a new continent, they came in small groups under their own power, bringing only the gear they needed. Most simply called themselves The People. Over time, those who chose the rougher freer life of the up country came to think of themselves as the Hill People.
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