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5/21/2016 9:09 AM
 

In the planning stages of getting gear together for a caribou hunt. As my partner and I discuss things one of our hot topics is which boots to wear. On a previous hunt he wore all cordura nylon boots made by Rocky and said they worked great. While the rest of his group had wet soggy leather boots after a few days of hunting, his dried out every night. Of course Rocky no longer makes those boots, and extensive online research doesn't turn up a whole lot of options. Most of the boots we find have more leather in them than we want. Our trip is in early August, so insulation is of minimal importance.

Any of you have suggestions? 

 
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5/21/2016 7:01 PM
 

Hmm...well, since you are not so worried about cold, but are planning on getting wet feet, and want to dry your boots out quick, with minimal or no leather, then here are two I might suggest:

Rocky S2V Jungle Boot http://www.rockyboots.com/sale/rocky-.... Also, the Aku Pilgrim https://squareup.com/store/procuremen...

Both boots use very little leather, drain and dry fast (the Rocky dries faster), are supportive (the Pilgrim is more supportive and nimble), and both will put up with hard use.  Hope that helps!


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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5/22/2016 7:33 AM
 
Good suggestions, alpendrms.
As I looked at these boots and others on the Rocky site it got me to wondering about a similar style boot with the addition of Goretex. Suggestions or thoughts anyone? Since it will give me more options I'm willing to consider insulated boots as well.
 
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5/22/2016 7:51 AM
 

If you go to the same site in the link for the Aku Pilgrim boots and look at their other models, you'll see that they make a version of the Pilgrim with Goretex.  However, using Goretex boots only works if you are sure that you won't get water or moisture over the top of them.  Otherwise, once they get wet inside, they take days to dry.  You had mentioned about guys with leather boots got wet last time...I'd be willing to bet some of those guys had leather boots with Goretex liners.  The Rocky boots your friend had on may not have had Goretex liners, which likely allowed them to dry quickly.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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5/22/2016 4:21 PM
 
alpendrms, I agree with your point about the Goretex. Have spent quite a bit of time looking at different boots today, and the perfect boot seems to be a pretty elusive commodity. Lots of boots have some features I'm looking for, but none I've found seem to have them all. The good news is I've got lots of time for my search.
 
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5/25/2016 8:48 AM
 
Tundra is a tough nut to crack. I suspect a fabric / goretex boot paired with a good pair of gaiters would work OK. Agreed that leather and goretex is a bad choice. If you're going leather (GT or no), be sure to use sno-seal as your outer coating.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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5/30/2016 12:52 PM
 
I lived in AK for 4years and did several north slope caribou hunts through tundra. I am not a big fan of gortex lined boots except for in the tundra. As mentioned before if you are walking multiple days in a row the boots are going to get wet on the inside through sweat. But you feet will be absolutely soaked in the tundra if you don't have it. Lots of socks and foot maintenance is key. Also I would recommend a taller boot. You ankles will be smoked by the end of the day from slipping off the tussocks and you will appreciate the extra ankle support.

The best description of walking across the tundra that I have heard is imagine filling a highschool gym with 6 inches of water. Then put 3/4 inflated volleyballs in to cover the floor. Then walk across the gym on the volleyballs. That is what tundra walking is like.

This is what works for me. Hope you find something that works for you.

Side note: This seems like a pretty ingenious way of drying boots at night if you get a chance. I haven't tried it out but I will someday soon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sxcgA4BWQw
 
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5/30/2016 9:00 PM
 
Appreciate you sharing your insight, crew. Thanks!
 
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6/1/2016 10:11 AM
 
Another lightweight military (style) boot is the Nike SFB. More minimal than the Rocky, but that's my preference. Come in 8" and 6" height which is a nice option for those of us who prefer them. Breathe well and have drain vents near sole. Just spent four days in mine hiking in warm western CO and really liked that my feet weren't swimming at the end of the day.

"Law is error, you see. It's an attempt to write down a lot of things that everyone ought to know anyway" ~~~ Freeman ibn Solomon - The Gone-Away World (Nick Harkaway)
 
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6/1/2016 12:33 PM
 
tom lambrecht wrote:
Another lightweight military (style) boot is the Nike SFB. More minimal than the Rocky, but that's my preference. Come in 8" and 6" height which is a nice option for those of us who prefer them. Breathe well and have drain vents near sole. Just spent four days in mine hiking in warm western CO and really liked that my feet weren't swimming at the end of the day.

Had an issued pair of those, and although they were very comfortable, they fell apart on me only halfway through a deployment in Iraq.  I had other boots with me, which I rotated into the mix, so the Nikes weren't even being worn day in-day out.  Unfortunate, because they did fit well and were über-light & nimble.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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6/2/2016 9:24 AM
 
alpendrms wrote:

Had an issued pair of those, and although they were very comfortable, they fell apart on me only halfway through a deployment in Iraq.  I had other boots with me, which I rotated into the mix, so the Nikes weren't even being worn day in-day out.  Unfortunate, because they did fit well and were über-light & nimble.

 

I can believe it. My pair of 12.5s weigh about 19 ounces each for a six inch boot and you definitely sacrifice some hard use when you're trimming ounces.. That said, I'm rarely rucking over 20 pounds, almost never over 45 and I've been a minimalist shoe user for a couple years and my lower leg musculature and foot placement has changed accordingly.

 

"Law is error, you see. It's an attempt to write down a lot of things that everyone ought to know anyway" ~~~ Freeman ibn Solomon - The Gone-Away World (Nick Harkaway)
 
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6/13/2016 8:27 PM
 
I'm currently researching a new offering by Altra that is coming out later this summer. It is a waterproof version of their Lone Peak trail shoe (Neoshell) and is 6" in height. I'm hoping I like it as much as I do my Lone Peak low top trail shoes.
 
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6/13/2016 9:12 PM
 

kevhans wrote:
I'm currently researching a new offering by Altra that is coming out later this summer. It is a waterproof version of their Lone Peak trail shoe (Neoshell) and is 6" in height.

 Like to hear how those work out. One gear item I'm always wearing out is footwear.


"Law is error, you see. It's an attempt to write down a lot of things that everyone ought to know anyway" ~~~ Freeman ibn Solomon - The Gone-Away World (Nick Harkaway)
 
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6/14/2016 10:55 AM
 
I have the low-top version of the Altra Lone Peak shoes with the Neoshell fabric and I totally love them. As I've aged, my feet have naturally flattened and lengthened (thanks a lot Gravity!) and I've developed some foot issues that I never had as a younger fellow. These shoes with the foot shaped toe box seem heaven-sent to me. Their performance has been flawless. I wore them hunting all of last season with some light gaitors covering the tops to keep out debris. I wore them in light snow and very heavy rain along the sides of very steep canyons in Hell's Canyon areas of Idaho. With medium weight wool socks my feet were warm and cozy through all temperature ranges (20F to 50F), and ALWAYS dry. I'm impressed with the Neoshell and will be getting the boots in July. I also use the shoes for trail running, and even training inside--they breathe very well for waterproof fabric. Even on trail runs in temperatures above 80F my feet have not overheated. And the shoes are still going strong since September last year. Love'em.
 
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6/14/2016 11:17 AM
 
splatshot wrote:
I have the low-top version of the Altra Lone Peak shoes with the Neoshell fabric and I totally love them. As I've aged, my feet have naturally flattened and lengthened (thanks a lot Gravity!) and I've developed some foot issues that I never had as a younger fellow. These shoes with the foot shaped toe box seem heaven-sent to me. Their performance has been flawless. I wore them hunting all of last season with some light gaitors covering the tops to keep out debris. I wore them in light snow and very heavy rain along the sides of very steep canyons in Hell's Canyon areas of Idaho. With medium weight wool socks my feet were warm and cozy through all temperature ranges (20F to 50F), and ALWAYS dry. I'm impressed with the Neoshell and will be getting the boots in July. I also use the shoes for trail running, and even training inside--they breathe very well for waterproof fabric. Even on trail runs in temperatures above 80F my feet have not overheated. And the shoes are still going strong since September last year. Love'em.

 

Thanks for the informative review, splatshot. I, too, have used the Lone Peaks for several years now and really like them. Have never tried the Neoshell version though. Your favorable comments make me lean strongly that way. Two things that have held me back are:

1. Questions about the durability of the Neoshell material. My original Lone Peaks are very durable and I've read some reviews on the early Neoshell's durability that were less than favorable.

2. The other reservation I have is whether or not the Neoshell is truly waterproof. Some reviews suggest that if water contacts the tongue of the shoe it soaks right in.

Any other observations you can offer would be greatly welcomed.

Thanks.

 

 
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6/14/2016 12:10 PM
 
Hi Kevhans,
regarding durability of the Neoshell, in my opinion, it has held up as well or better than other trail running shoes I have had over the years. I'm certain it is not as rugged as leather on standard hiking boots, but I can attest that there is not much more rugged country than Hell's Canyon and they held up well for two weeks of hunting the steep hills and for several months since. I'm very satisfied with its durability.

As for waterproofness, I don't believe the entire tongue is made from Neoshell--I don't have my shoes close to check for sure, but I wore them many times in the rain and never got wet feet. A few times, the rain was so heavy that some ran down my legs and into my shoes, but from mid-foot forward the only moisture was evaporating sweat and my toes remained dry. In heavy rain, I wore lightweight, non-waterproof gaitors that had a rough exterior for water to run off but not waterproof--those covered the upper part of the tongue and I never noticed my feet becoming wet.

One time I went for run (foolishly) in an incredible wind and rain storm a littel outside of Portland, OR. It was night and I was wearing a Surefire headlamp. I nearly, within inches, collided with a little two-point black-tailed deer on the trail and was dodging broken branches and falling trees. When I returned to my hotel after 30 min. the ONLY dry part of my entire body was my wool sock/Lone Peak covered feet.

The bottom tread, I believe, is the same across all Lone Peaks, and is a bit softer than most running shoes and mine has worn down, but not excessively, and the softness contributes to its ability to provide good grip/traction
 
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6/14/2016 2:46 PM
 
splatshot,
Thanks for the additional info...all good firsthand stuff!
 
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6/14/2016 4:22 PM
 

I too am waiting curiously for the Lone Peak high tops. I have two generations of lone peaks and really like the traction and the zero-drop, I would call durability just so-so. My biggest problem with my lone peaks is that they don't hold my foot very securely and they try to slid off the sole side hilling or going downhill. I just tried on some Altra Superiors that seem much more secure, and I'm hoping the high-tops will also hold onto my foot better. 

 
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6/14/2016 4:46 PM
 
Fowler,
The Superior is another Altra shoe I have contemplated trying, but I've always been so satisfied with my Lone Peaks I've never made the leap. Trying the Superior on could you notice the difference in cushioning? Altra lists the Lone Peak as having "moderate cushioning" and the Superior as having "light cushioning." I also see the stack height is 25mm for the Lone Peak vs. 21mm for the Superior.
If you acquire any field experience with the Superiors please pass it on.
 
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6/15/2016 2:52 PM
 

I briefly had some superiors that where a half size too small, you could tell there was a difference in the cushion, but I don't think it was enough to make a big difference by the end of the day. Same tread pattern and all, fairly sure the midsole is just a bit thinner, if you remove the rockplate in the superior it would probably be very noticeably more minimal. 

 
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