Hill People Gear Forums
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralKnife sharpening and worksharp Ken Onion editionKnife sharpening and worksharp Ken Onion edition
Previous
 
Next
New Post
7/4/2017 8:14 PM
 

I recently picked up a worksharp KO to touch up a couple of bark river knives I've had for awhile and could use some attention. I wanted to perfect the process before using it on my bravo 1 and other knives. I've been trying to get an HK knives auto folder hair popping sharp as many people have said is easily possible with the worksharp. The HK is made by Benchmade and uses 440c steel. I have probably watched every youtube video there is on using the damn thing and I just can't seem to get the results I want, it just stops at sharp not super sharp. I don't have the strop belt from Amazon yet but plan on getting one. Does anyone out there have any experience with using the worksharp and getting amazing results? 

 
New Post
7/5/2017 7:00 AM
 

I agree.  I think the Ken Onion Work Sharp will do a decent working edge, but not a razor edge.  I use mine from time to time, but when I really want to do some serious work on my blades, I use a 30" Belt Sander that I bought from Harbour Freight for ~ $30.  I purchased special sharpening belts for it from Lee Valley Tools that go from 40 down to 15 microns.  I also bought a leather stropping belt to use with it.  I combine using my 30" Belt Sander with a standard bench strop, black and green honing compounds, and also a smaller stropping kit that I bought from Knives Ship Free.  I've got a soft surface mouse pad, a leather block, and sections of sand paper that go from 400 to 2000 grit.  The process I use creates a convex edge on my blades...but that is what I prefer anyway.  Your Barkies have a full convex grind, too.  One other thing that I recently learned about is using a strip of denim for stropping.  I learned of this from my friend and knife maker Alex Wander of Wander Tactical.  He showed me how to do it during an evening at some recent tracking training we were conducting.  He said..."Once you see what kind of edge bluejeans produce, you'll never go back."  I must agree....for final stropping and getting that "hair-popping edge" we love to have on some blades, denim sure does work nicely.  You probably also have to take into account that the steel on that HK folder is going to be tougher to sharpen, because it's stainless.  

Anyway....hope these suggestions help you out a bit.

Ken sends.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
7/5/2017 12:47 PM
 
Stainless steel blades can have a tendency to be harder to sharpen than carbon steel blades, it very well could be the steel more so than the sharpening method. No matter what sharpening system you use you might not ever get than particular knife to the sharpness that you desire. It's all a trade off with blade steels, I personally stay away from stainless steel blades. I simply do not need the corrosion resistance of a stainless and find carbon steels far easier to sharpen and maintain.
 
New Post
7/5/2017 1:08 PM
 

Just to add....even when I have sharpened carbon steel knives using the Work Sharp, I could never get them "just right".  I always had to follow up with some of the other methods I described above.  Now, sometimes having a blade too sharp for hard use can result in chipped or rolled edges, but for the most part the knives I strop and sharpen on my belt sander are very good quality steels that handle tasks without damaging the edge in most cases.  When I only need the blade to have a good working edge, the Work Sharp performs well enough.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
7/5/2017 6:40 PM
 

The 440c knife is my daily knife so I'm not as concerned with it being beyond sharp it was just my tester knife and I guess it has a good working edge as descriped, it is sharp enough to shave. The bark river's in question all have different steels, cmp3v for my go to outdoor knive a bravo 1, my second one is a huntsman and I bought it second hand and the type of steel isn't listed on the blade like their newer knives so I don't know the steel or how to find out but this one I use for dressing game and want very sharp, the last one is a little knife that doesn't get much attention it's a 154cm stainless. I need to remember that with the convex edge I'm going to sacrifice a little sharpness for better edge retention. A flat gring is more for hair popping with a thinner profile blade. I'll just keep working at it with the wsko and I will definitely try the denim strop trick with the 2 compounds suggested.

 
New Post
7/6/2017 7:59 AM
 
I use a worksharp and a compound / bench strop and cardboard strop. Work sharp by itself will always have 1 slightly rolled edge that needs straightening. The reason why SS is difficult to sharpen is in the grain structure of the metal. The chromium microstructure is large and buttery soft compared to the alloys and smaller carbides residing in the matrix. It will smear and roll over, hiding what could be a really sharp edge. Try easing the pressure on your final passes of sharpening amd stropping and see if you dont get that poppin edge youve been looking for that the chromium content was hiding. Source: I used to do materials science development for military contracts.
 
New Post
7/7/2017 7:22 PM
 
The reason why SS is difficult to sharpen is in the grain structure of the metal. The chromium microstructure is large and buttery soft compared to the alloys and smaller carbides residing in the matrix. It will smear and roll over, hiding what could be a really sharp edge.
Thanks
Machinists call that galling. SS won't make clean chips like mild or carbon steel

 

 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralKnife sharpening and worksharp Ken Onion editionKnife sharpening and worksharp Ken Onion edition