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7/20/2017 5:02 AM
 

A friend of mine is selling a canoe.  Its an Old Town; model unknown.  The only thing printed on it is "Old Town."  I didnt think to get the serial number while I was there looking at it.  It is a 2 seater with the contoured plastic seats with no back rests.  IIRC it has 1 wooden center crossmember.

Anyway, it definitely needs some work.  The hull appears solid without cracks, but a little weathered.  The gunwale is broken in 3 places and the crossmember and front seat have broken off of the gunwale on one side.

He only wants $100 for it though.

Questions:  Can it be effectively repaired or will it always seem like its lacking?  If it can, then what would be the best way?  I was thinking I could epoxy all the breaks and redrill mounting holes.  Or is it even worth the trouble to repair?

If I get it it will be tested in the Rio Grande before running down a Class 2-3 section of the Rio Chama in NM and who knows what afterward, but mostly on rivers.

*Edited to correct typos

 
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7/20/2017 8:37 AM
 
Quick hit and run -

First question is what the hull shape looks like in cross section. That will determine whether it will be useful to you as a river boat. It sort of sounds like you have the same old town I do which isn't a proper river boat but works pretty nicely on class 1-2.

Repair is no problem. I think the gunwale is mostly window dressing and all of the other refurb materials are available online including seats and thwarts. For river running, you'll be dropping seats anyway.

Don't take this the wrong way, but I can tell by your Qs that you aren't an experienced river canoer. My thinking is that getting this canoe and setting it up for river running will be a great education requiring a lot of research into what works best. Then one day down the road if you really get into higher end river tripping there will be a canoe you end up lusting after because you've learned so much about what you really like and want on the river.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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7/20/2017 9:06 AM
 

You are exactly correct about my experience.  This would be the first canoe I have owned personally; although definitely not my first time in one, though most of my experience is on calmer water.  I have also never paid attention to the differences between the canoes I have been in.

Up to this point I could not justify the few hundred it would take to get one, but this is a bit cheaper and I feel confident in my repair abilities.  I just wanted to see if there is a better way (or an obvious problem) that I am missing.

Im a fan of approaching new things by buying cheaper gear until I know enough about the activity to know what kind of nice gear I would actually want.  Im pretty sure that canoe wont be optimized for river running, but its better than no canoe.  I just want to get out and do something.

 
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7/20/2017 11:30 AM
 

A proper river canoe will have a fair amount of rocker (amount of tip and tail rise), won't have any keel at all, and will be more rounded than squared in cross section. But all of those things will also make the canoe more squirrely and less forgiving in general.

My canoe is one of these: https://www.oldtowncanoe.com/canoes/recreation/guide_160/

Although not really a river canoe, it has done just fine on class 1-2 water. It doesn't sideslip or pivot as easily but it has enough rocker and shallow enough curve to do well enough. At the same time it is nice and stable when loaded up on a lake with kids. And even on the river the secondary chines give a sense of confidence. I did remove the seats and put in drop seats (including a center seat) made out of marine grade plywood coated with varnish. That was an inexpensive project and they work quite nicely. For the river, you want to drop the center of gravity by dropping the paddler(s). I sort of suspect this is the canoe your friend has because it's been around so long and is so versatile. Pretty sure its their best seller.

My understanding is that these hulls never go bad and all the trimmings are pretty easily replaced. This will give you an idea what store bought replacement parts (gunwales, seats, yokes, etc.) cost: http://www.shop.northwestcanoe.com/Canoe-Seats-Parts_c80.htm


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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7/27/2017 6:20 AM
 

Its been a busy week.  Anyway I finally got the canoe home.  I probably wont get to tearing it apart until monday though.

According to what you said, its not optimized for rivers.  The bottom is flat from front to back and side to side.

Does anyone know what model it is?  I found a registration or license sticker of some sort from Grand Teton National Park from 1974.  So its old.

And thanks Evan for all of your help.

 

Edit:  Well I guess my photo link doesnt work and Im not too motivated to figure out why so Ill just leave it at that and say thanks for the help.

 
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