Hill People Gear Forums
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralCamp ShoesCamp Shoes
Previous
 
Next
New Post
3/29/2014 10:10 PM
 

I was wandering around town today cheking out the spring clearence sales today and saw the Pakems. It actually got me thinking about making my own inspired by these http://empirecanvasworks.com/truenorthboots.htm

The rubber sole with a canvas/ cordura upper and paracord lacing. I even thought you could get some really big rag wool socks to use as a liner for comfort and warmth. Either glue or add some stitching to attach the sock to the shell. They use recycled car tires for their sole, I have access to a lot of old bike tires that I think would make a nice lightweight option. If you wanted to get really fancy you could add a pair of the Superfeet wool/ cork insoles.


"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
New Post
3/30/2014 11:04 AM
 

The sole is the killer when it comes to weight. I got a pair of those canvas shoes with a rubber sole and they felt light, but on the scale where a pound.  When I made my moccasins I used boot sole leather which was 1/4" thick for longevity. It was a pain in the ass to work with, and I am not sure how much longevity it gave me. I later worked with a guy who only used moccasins on horseback after getting a boot caught when bucked off.  His trick was to make the moccasins with several layers of lightweight leather on the sole, and then paint them with a rubber boot repair compound.  He did several layers of the goo, and when it started to wear to bad he would clean them and repaint.  I can't remember the product, but basically it was a paint that formed a rubber seal when finishes.  He swore by it, and supposedly had tired other sole methods.  I always figured if I made another pair I would use a truck tire innertube as the bottom layer.  The plus to his method was that he was just able to keep the existing moccasin working and not have to sew on anything to the sole. 


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
4/1/2014 3:36 PM
 

http://www.sodhoppers.com/html/goop.html

Might be this stuff, my sisters-in-law made their own when they started shoe-making, now they just buy the thinnest vibram sole they can find (3mm I think).

I tried some coated cordura moccasins but they ended up being too sweaty, even with good socks. Might try some softshell fabric next.

 
New Post
4/1/2014 11:23 PM
 

Scot,

I dont have time to read all the replies to see if your need was addressed, but what about these?
http://www.inov-8.com/new/global/Product-View-FLite-195-Black-White.html?L=27

That time the three of us went overnight around the monument, these are what I wore for the entirety of the trip.  I wouldn't hike in the desert in them again as they are essentially mesh, but they are wicked light, pretty damn tough (1.5 years of near daily crossfit in them until sliding down ropes finally tore them up), and comfortable.  Can be slipped on easily too when you leave them untied.  Hell, I would even do all my water crossings in them if need be then just carabiner them to your pack to dry in that arid air while you move.


----------------------------------------------------------------------- Excuse me while I whip this out.
 
New Post
4/2/2014 9:17 AM
 

Something like that I think will be my summer shoe, but for now I am using the slippers from Wild Things. If I don't like them in the summer I will try something else.


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
4/17/2014 1:21 PM
 

How do the Wild Things run?  I'm either a size 9 or 9 1/2 and that's also where they divide the M and L. 

 
New Post
4/18/2014 1:02 AM
 

If you're making your own, or even want to re-sole something you already have this is the stuff you want http://fiveten.com/products/accessories/resole. The C4 Dot Kit is the most versatile. They use the same stuff on their mountain bike shoes. I've been using them for years and the stuff is like nothing else. It's super sticky and suprisingly durable. Even with heavy use I can get 2-3 years out of a pair of shoes and the soles themselves are rarley what falls apart.


"Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children."
 
New Post
6/8/2014 3:34 PM
 

Nothinz.  I just carabiner them to the outside of my pack if there isn't room enough inside.  They are lighter and more comfortable than Crocs.  They also won a lawsuit by crocs.

http://www.nothinz.com/

 
New Post
6/12/2014 8:47 AM
 

I've enjoyed this thread, because I, too, have been on a several year quest for the perfect camp/trail shoe. Vivobarefoot makes some interesting shoes.

Regarding the previous post about the Nothinz; I'm curious as to their durability??? I see they have some styles on closeout and may be trying a pair this summer.

LL Bean years ago used to sell a canvas canoe shoe that I think would be ideal, but it is no longer made. Other than Converse Chuck Taylors is anyone aware of other canvas shoe options?

I'm hoping others continue to chime in on this thread.

Thanks.

 
New Post
6/12/2014 11:37 AM
 

I vaguely remember those and they would be nice. All the canvas shoes I have tried have had a very heavy sole so they were not ideal. I still haven't found exactly what I am looking for so I also hope others chime in.


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
6/14/2014 5:34 PM
 
Yea, they seem to be reasonably durable. About the same as crocs from what I can tell. They're a little softer than crocs, but for what I use them for - camp shoes and crossing creeks - they work great. They also allow the rear strap to unbutton, which I don't think the crocs do?
 
New Post
6/20/2014 9:39 AM
 

http://www.itstactical.com/gearcom/footwear/exclusive-first-look-at-the-arcteryx-technical-performance-footwear-line/

These may well be the ticket...

It is a two part system: outer boot shell and a removable goretex inner bootie that is soled for use as a camp shoe.

No extra weight for two options and if the goretex layer fails, it can be replaced separately from the outershell.

Great concept and not too expensive per reports (<$300 ,if I recall)

TBD is if it will be wide enough for my hobbit feet and I have been a weenie with my zerodrop preferences for the past few years.

 
New Post
6/20/2014 9:44 AM
 

It will be interesting to see how those develop. I have found I don't like zero drop and they look like it to me. I have seen price guesses all over the map.  I haven't seen a reliable estimate yet, but haven't really looked either. 


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
11/3/2017 3:13 PM
 

To revive this thread, right now I use my old Slip on Vans, but this Teva Ember Moc looks like a possiblity

https://www.teva.com/men-shoes/ember-moc/190108953732.html?source=shoppingsite_PLA_1018226-BLK-09&kpid=1018226-BLK-09&source=shoppingsite_PLA:%7Bcampaign%7D:&kpid=:::ggl:&gclid=CPHon8Goo9cCFe24swodB1IKMw&gclsrc=ds

 
New Post
11/4/2017 7:29 PM
 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01...=UTF8&psc=1

 

I've used Nothinz as mentioned above.  But not a huge fan for some of the reasons originally mentioned in the opening post.  But for camp shoes hard to beat so far.

I'm going to try the above linked as camp shoes this next year.  I have a paid picked up, weigh almost nothing.  I'm thinking about putting a thick coating of shoe goo on the sole to make it a bit thicker, just because.  But I like them so far.

 
New Post
11/5/2017 11:06 AM
 
I've been using a pair of Merrell trail runners, the Trail Glove 3, but they're still almost a pound in weight I believe. Still, they pack small enough and feel light enough for my purposes
 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralCamp ShoesCamp Shoes