Hill People Gear Forums
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralQuality Hard-Use Winter Backcountry GlovesQuality Hard-Use Winter Backcountry Gloves
Previous
 
Next
New Post
12/14/2016 4:26 PM
 
Picked up a pair of really nice elkskin gloves from Altai Skis.  These are very similar to the unlined Geiers that I picked up at the Rancher store in Grand Junction a few winters ago, which the Hill bros turned me on to and they are still going strong, except these Churchill gloves are fleece lined.  Made in the USA by Churchill Glove Company in Centralia, WA.



 


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
12/14/2016 5:33 PM
 

I use OR gloves and literally replace them every 3 years because the material just is not made for all the hard work I put it through. These look like a nice option. Thanks for the intel brother. This is my last winter in MI than I am doing one more move to Alameda, CA but am going to beg Santa for these to use during my last winter survival courses here at my current unit. 

 
New Post
12/14/2016 6:12 PM
 
Those do look great. I just picked up some TRUCK gloves that I have high hopes for too if people are looking for a more traditional ski glove.
 
New Post
12/14/2016 6:20 PM
 

Glad to help, Gents!  Here is a link to the specific model from Altai.  

https://us-store.altaiskis.com/produc...


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
12/14/2016 7:05 PM
 
alpendrms wrote:
, except these Churchill gloves are fleece lined.



 

 BAD JOO-JOO, IME, at frosty temps. Just like "lined" boots.  Why would these lined gloves be a better backcountry solution than a wool liner (that can be removed and quickly dried) and a good pair of leather gloves (which might dry, if your lucky)?

 
New Post
12/14/2016 7:36 PM
 

Unless it's full-on "death cold", these will be fine.  Especially since I use a tipi with a wood stove in the winter, where I am easily able to dry them out.  Plus, processing a lot of wood and doing work around a winter camp...perfect for my needs.  If it's really cold, I always have a pair of mittens along as back-ups.  For my uses and for general winter activities...I would use these without hesitation.  Would I use these in minus whatever temps?  Of course not.  But then again, I'm probably not going to camp when it's that cold...because I don't have to anymore.  I'll be fine skiing with these or in a Rocky Mountains winter camp.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
12/15/2016 8:33 AM
 
Ken- do you think you'll apply a wax/oil to those, such as sno-seal? I have some unlined leather gloves that I treated with sno-seal that have done me well for damp weather work. I like that they are made in the USA too! They'd be good for tipi/stove use- I imagine the insulation would allow you to handle hot pots and such pretty well.

Any word on the makeup of the fleece? I assume it's synthetic?
 
New Post
12/15/2016 8:52 AM
 
SuperBadger wrote:
Ken- do you think you'll apply a wax/oil to those, such as sno-seal? I have some unlined leather gloves that I treated with sno-seal that have done me well for damp weather work. I like that they are made in the USA too! They'd be good for tipi/stove use- I imagine the insulation would allow you to handle hot pots and such pretty well.

Any word on the makeup of the fleece? I assume it's synthetic?

I'll either use Sno-Seal or Obenauf's on them (the Obenauf's will soften them for more pliability).  They feel like they've already been treated, but I'll certainly want to waterproof them more.  They use their Sherpa lining, which is an acrylic-cotton mix.  Normally, the cotton content would give me pause, but since I know how I will use them....basically just how you describe, Badger.....they will be fine.  If I were really worried about a wet environment, then I would make a different choice.  That said, for the stuff we do out in the Rockies, which is drier, these will do nicely.  Even for some things here in the east or out in the Cascades, I think if the leather is properly waterproofed, and as long as you aren't shoving your hands into a trout stream or deep slush, they'll still do fine.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
12/15/2016 9:27 AM
 
I usually have a couple sets of gloves with me when I am out, and one set is usually a waterproof mitten shell with a liner or liner gloves. If I am out multiple days I'll usually do this regardless of what type of primary glove I am wearing. I guess the goal for me is to have a backup option to get my hands warm/dexterous enough to accomplish necessary tasks. Alternately, if the temps end up being colder than I anticipate I've got a shell mitten to throw on for extra protection. A friend of mine who is an avid backcountry skier uses cheapo hardware store insulated work gloves most of the time.

Those gloves look great for front country stuff too- wood stacking, snow clearing, etc.

The cold/dry snow conditions of the Rockies and Eastern Oregon always surprise me.

A topic I'd like to also research is the natural adaptation of the hands to cold weather. I seem to recall reading some info about studies that had been done on various cold weather peoples, and their hands ability to stay relatively warm while uncovered and working in the cold- skinning seals or what have you.

 
New Post
12/15/2016 11:44 AM
 
I bought a pair of leather gloves with thinsulte liners from Carhartt years ago and liberally treat them with snow seal once a year or so. I original got them for the exact same uses as Alpndrms, but found that for me personally, they were just too warm. I find that for the vast majority of the time my OR nomex/leather gloves are about perfect, when I need a bit more warmth, but still have dexterity I put a pair of fingerless rag wool gloves over those. Other than that I go straight to the OR mittens. However, those same gloves are my favorite cold weather motorcycle gloves. I find them to be perfect for when the weather gets cold as they are very comfortable, warm, and shed water like crazy. I have never had them wet out and need drying from the outside. I did sweat them out a time or two. If it gets really chilly or I am going to be in a heavy rain for hours on end I go to a pair of snowmobile gloves for the gauntlet to seal my sleeve ends and also for the greater warmth (on the back of the hand they are about three times as thick). I know a lot of folks in very cold tempts that swear by sno seal treated leather mittens with rag wool liners. They switch the liners out and run the outters all the time. Like everything else figure out if it works for you, but I found that unless I was generating to much heat leading to sweating them out from the inside, they keep my hands warm and dry.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
12/15/2016 5:42 PM
 
SuperBadger wrote:

A topic I'd like to also research is the natural adaptation of the hands to cold weather. I seem to recall reading some info about studies that had been done on various cold weather peoples, and their hands ability to stay relatively warm while uncovered and working in the cold- skinning seals or what have you.

 We saw it every winter in the infantry in AK with GI's.  It appeared to take one 2-wk FTX to get someone "trail-hard" as the sourdoughs up there refer to it.  We'd be packing up the squad tent wearing a watch cap, wool shirt, untying knots bare-handed our second winter there and the newbies were standing around shivering wearing their parkas/mittens.

Breathing cold air stimulates a lot of hormones.  Thyroxine for one, which raises your metabolism.  I don't remember the mechanism that causes peripheral blood vessels to dialate but this it what helps keep your hands and feet warm once you've adapted

 
New Post
12/15/2016 5:50 PM
 

TAK...100% agree.  During Winter Warfare trips with 10th Group in Canada, we got used to the cold so well that there would be guys running around in minus 20 weather in just PT shorts, boots, and a polypro top.  Downright amazing at times what the human body will become comfortable with, within reason.  As a comparative example....I remember when I lived in Kenya.....everytime there was what they considered a cold snap....like dropping into the 60s.....all of the locals in Nairobi were bundled up like they were on Everest!  Hoods, scarves, gloves, heavy coats, sweaters...and still shivering.  They were not accustomed to even the slightest bit of cold.  Us Westerners considered that kind of weather just perfect.

Edit:  The dudes weren't just "hanging out" in minus 20.....but moving to the latrines for a shower and stuff like that.  Just wanted to keep things in perspective.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
12/15/2016 8:29 PM
 

Interesting article on how the human body reacts to cold weather.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...

 


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
12/16/2016 10:49 AM
 
Ken,

Very interesting article! I guess I'll turn the thermostat down a few extra degrees. The article seems to support TAK's assessment of a two week "break in period"

 
New Post
12/16/2016 10:52 AM
 
CollinAshmore wrote:
Those do look great. I just picked up some TRUCK gloves that I have high hopes for too if people are looking for a more traditional ski glove.

I too picked up a pair of the M2's. I am looking forward to trying them out once they arrive.

 
New Post
12/16/2016 11:45 AM
 
SuperBadger,

They feel great and fit my short fat stubby hands extremely well. They seem to be built really well, and they even send Obenauf's with them to seal them additionally. We'll see. It hasn't been cold enough to wear them yet, but I have worn my M1's and I love the Polartec lining. It is really warm.
 
New Post
12/17/2016 8:52 AM
 

Ive got a pair of Kinco gloves that I baked a tub of snow seal into.   I haven't used them around fire but they deal with moisture pretty well.

http://www.gemplers.com/product/1927S...

 

 
New Post
12/26/2016 6:51 AM
 
Hi Ken,

Have you treated these with Snoseal or Obenauf's yet? Did it soften them significantly? I couldn't help myself and bought a pair. They are really nice.
 
New Post
12/26/2016 8:45 AM
 
CollinAshmore wrote:
Hi Ken,

Have you treated these with Snoseal or Obenauf's yet? Did it soften them significantly? I couldn't help myself and bought a pair. They are really nice.

Hi Colin!  Hope you had a great Christmas.  I have treated mine with Obenauf's and that did soften them up significantly.  I don't think SnoSeal will soften them as much. 

Yep...I really like mine, too!

 


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
New Post
12/27/2016 6:46 AM
 
Same to you Ken, hope the holiday was great. And thank you for letting me know!
 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralQuality Hard-Use Winter Backcountry GlovesQuality Hard-Use Winter Backcountry Gloves