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5/15/2013 12:48 PM
 

Compiled this for a relative / friend who wants to get back into backpacking after a hiatus of a couple decades. Someone else may get value out of it. It's pretty much my standard 3 season load. Depending on ground conditions, either hillsound trail crampons or 25" snowshoes are added. Might swap out dual 1qts in the wand pockets for dual 1.5qts. In winter, woodstove, overmitts and puffy pants get added and I may carry TNF zero degree bag instead.

On top of pack:

  • Mountain Hardwear Exposure parka (hard shell waterproof breathable, but considerably more breathable than any others I've used – you can legitimately hike in it)
  • HPG WindCheater.
  • Crazy Creek Hex Grid Chair (on bottom of pack)

Inside pack (Ute):

  • Wallet and keys in zip top lid pocket
  • Size medium Mountain Serape (first thing inside of pack on top. Goes under my MH parka if necessary, goes around my sleeping bag at night)
  • Food bag, mix of dehydrated meals and granola bars with a squeeze tube of peanut butter. Good chocolate bar. You can quickly and easily add an unnecessary 5lbs to your pack in food alone. On the other hand, food is an area where you can buy a lot of felt luxury with the weight you add
  • Mesh stuff sack with spare midweight Longie top, spare pair of socks, beard brush, ibuprofen, 2 newspaper bags (vapor barrier liners), liner socks (to be used with VBLs), spare bootlaces, spare TP roll, spare flask of denatured alcohol
  • Thermarest Neoair Trekker 25” wide
  • GoLite Utopia 2 (no longer made)
  • Wild Things Primaloft Booties
  • North Face Cat’s Meow long (20 degree bag). In warmer times of the year, I might substitute a 40 degree bag instead, still used in conjunction with the Serape as an overbag. Serape is good for 20-30 degree gain when used as overbag.
  • (2) 1qt Nalgene GI style canteens in side pockets

Inside back pocket (Connor):

  • First Aid Kit
  • Gaitors – worn underneath pants during rain. Upper thighs will get wet and also dry pretty quickly after the storm passes, everything else stays dry between gaitors and MH parka
  • 915 stuff sack for overflow capacity
  • 4 quart water bladder, empty
  • 3oz Gerber slide out wood saw
  • Sweetwater guardian water filter
  • 50ft 6mm accessory cord
  • HPG Tool Roll with stuff that basically never gets used, but important to have if needed
    • Bug head net
    • Water purification tabs (backup)
    • 1 spare lithium AA
    • 4 spare AAAs (spare batteries weigh less than a charger for the average duration pack trip) in GoalZero battery pack that can charge a phone
    • Garmin foretrex GPS
    • Firestarting kit – a bunch of bike innertube squares, lighter, fire steel, Uberfire tin, wetfire
    • Bug spray
    • afterbite
    • Sunscreen
    • spoon
    • (3) Heavy duty zip ties
    • small roll duct tape
    • orange signal panel
    • gun wipes
    • vaseline (water filter maintenance)
    • spare gasket for trangia stove
    • stainless safety pins
  • DeLorme InReach sat unit
  • Toilet paper and hand sanitizer
  • Halulite minimalist cook pot with trangia alcohol stove, windscreen, pot support, and spare fuel nested inside
  • Exped air pillow UL
  • Sunglasses
  • 3 section trekking pole set
  • Couple of granola bars
  • HillSound Trail crampons (in season)

On Prairie Belt:

  • (2) Nalgene 24oz bottles
  • Medium GP with Spare magazine(s) for pistol, camera tripod, granola bar or two
  • Grimloc that the gloves are often hung off of
  • First Spear SSV holster for pistol

Inside Heavy Recon Kit Bag:

  • Pistol w/ light on it
  • Fire starting kit (same as above, but also with some GI fire starter stuff)
  • Spoon
  • purification tabs in half of a cheapo contacts container 
  • 4” fixed blade knife
  • Polartec micro grid beanie
  • Signal mirror
  • Ear plugs
  • Couple packets of Via
  • travel packets of ibuprofen
  • energy gel
  • Petzl Tikka XP 2 headlamp
  • Leather palmed nomex gloves
  • Couple of notecards
  • Metal mechanical pencil
  • Phone in plastic bag case
  • Paper maps (used to make my own on a per trip basis, but finding it more convenient recently to have a wide area coverage trails illustrated map instead)
  • Camera in HPG small organizer bucket
  • 8x25 NIkon binos

In pockets:

  • Leatherman
  • Chapstick
  • Lighter
  •  (1) AAA flashlight

Updated 11/2015


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
5/15/2013 1:55 PM
 

Evan,

Approximately how much does this setup weigh?

 
New Post
5/15/2013 3:12 PM
 

Pack weight is 40lbs with (2) 1911 mags (45acp is relatively heavy) and 2 days / 1 night of food. Add about 1.5lb of food per day.

Kit Bag weight is 6lbs with 5" railed aluminum frame 1911 and TLR1.

There are some easy places to drop weight without sacrificing much:

  • 2 quarts water instead of 3, no binos. Fill up more often. 3.5lb savings.
  • 40 degree bag instead of 20 is good for a pound.
  • G19 with equivalent amount of ammo and TLR3 saves a pound.
  • single pole more minimalist non free standing shelter saves a pound
  • stay on trails, hike with someone else, leave the 8 oz InReach sat unit at home

I was trying to explain to my sis how much lighter good gear has gotten over the last decade. Best way I could put it is "I only carry around 45lbs, and you know how I roll". The same (or maybe even a little bit less) level of capability used to run closer to 60lbs.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
5/15/2013 10:44 PM
 

 Can you explain the "2 newspaper bags" please? I know what a vapor barrier is but I don't understand the newspaper bag or how it relates. 

I look forward to the first aid subject being talked about here. Nearly all of my first aid training came from my time in the .mil so I've noticed I build kits with that mentality. My big first aid kit on my big mountain ruck for example is about the size of two IFAK pouches. A while ago I split it in half and it's still much more than I need for my short solo outings.

 
New Post
5/16/2013 5:11 PM
 

You put the liner socks on your feet, then the newspaper bags, then your regular socks. The newspaper bags are VBLs. Cheap lightweight insurance in case you get into trouble with your feet. That system will also turn an uninsulated leather boot into a winter boot if you need that.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
5/16/2013 6:36 PM
 

 I feel dumb now. I got home from school and had to google it (should have done that first). I see you're talking about the plastic bags individual newspapers are delivered in. For some reason I was immagining the vest thingy that news paper boys carry the days deliveries in. 

 
New Post
5/16/2013 9:06 PM
 

is this for a typical overnight or a couple nights or more?  

 
New Post
5/17/2013 10:28 AM
 

The only difference for a longer or shorter trip is the amount of food and potentially another pair of socks or two.


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
5/17/2013 11:38 AM
 

scothill wrote

The only difference for a longer or shorter trip is the amount of food and potentially another pair of socks or two.

 

Thats kind of what I figured but thought I'd ask.  I didn't know if there might be some luxury item that gets hauled around on longer trips or something. 

 
New Post
5/17/2013 3:34 PM
 

Your carry list is pretty simple and mine is fairly close to it.  I don't carry a bag though unless it is below 30* out and I know that I am going to be staying out.  Otherwise, I am prepared for a longer than usual stay. I have found that the lighter my bag is the more I seem to enjoy the hike/trip.  Its funny how that works.  I wish that I would have learned this years ago.

 
New Post
5/17/2013 10:25 PM
 

evanhill wrote
 

Compiled this for a relative / friend who wants to get back into backpacking after a hiatus of a couple decades. Someone else may get value out of it. It's pretty much my standard 3 season load. Depending on ground conditions, either hillsound trail crampons or 25" snowshoes are added. Might swap out dual 1qts in the wand pockets for dual 1.5qts. In winter, woodstove, overmitts and puffy pants get added and I may carry TNF zero degree bag instead.

On top of pack:

  • Mountain Hardwear Exposure parka (hard shell waterproof breathable, but considerably more breathable than any others I've used – you can legitimately hike in it)
  • REI Endeavor Vest.


Inside pack (Ute):

  • Wallet and keys in zip top lid pocket There's nothing to pay for in the backcountry except altitude and distance and you only need one key to get back in your rig. Wrap some bills around a debit card & driver's license if it makes you feel better and rubber band your truck key to it.  Ziplock 'em if you like. Leave the rest at home or in your rig's lockbox.
  • First Aid Kit secured to underside of lid. Subject in and of itself, but probably 1lb all up
  • Mountain Serape (first thing inside of pack on top. Goes under my MH parka if necessary, goes around my sleeping bag at nighto)
  • Food bag, mix of dehydrated meals and granola bars with a squeeze tube of peanut butter. Good chocolate bar. You can quickly and easily add an unnecessary 5lbs to your pack in food alone. On the other hand, food is an area where you can buy a lot of felt luxury with the weight you add
  • Mesh stuff sack with spare midweight Longie top, spare pair of socks, beard brush, ibuprofen, 2 newspaper bags (vapor barrier liners), liner socks (to be used with VBLs), spare bootlaces, spare TP roll, spare flask of denatured alcohol Spare.....longie top? TP Roll? Beard brush? Bootlaces? Denatured alcohol? 
  • Thermarest Neoair Trekker 25” wide
  • GoLite Utopia 2 (no longer made)  Where's the woodstove?
  • North Face Cat’s Meow long (20 degree bag). In warmer times of the year, I might substitute a 40 degree bag instead, still used in conjunction with the Serape as an overbag. Serape is good for 20-30 degree gain when used as overbag. Have you looked at the delta if you just substituted an appropriate bag for expected temps and ditch the weight and bulk of the Serape?  I suspect you are adding considerable weight/bulk to your pack that you could otherwise forego.
  • (2) 1qt Nalgene GI style canteens in side pockets


Inside back pocket (Palspocket):

  • Gaitors – worn underneath pants during rain. Upper thighs will get wet and also dry pretty quickly after the storm passes, everything else stays dry between gaitors and MH parka You wear your gaiters underneath your pants???
  • 915 stuff sack for overflow capacity
  • 2 quart water bladder, empty
  • 3oz Gerber slide out wood saw
  • Sweetwater guardian water filter Try the Sawyer Squeeze. Significant weight and volume reduction. You are packing the water bladder anyway.
  • Small pocket of stuff that basically never gets used, but important to have if needed
    • Water purification tabs (backup) Didn't you already have a backup for this?  Why not boil for backup?
    • 2 spare lithium AAs
    • 4 spare lithium AAAs (spare batteries weigh less than a charger for the average duration pack trip)
    • Phone battery charger
    • Garmin foretrex GPS I don't get the GPS redundancy thing.  Where's your compass?
    • Lightweight sharpening steel Sharpening steel? Please tell me you are not still using that brass enclosed POS thingy.   Try one of these EZE-LAP Hone & Stones http://eze-lap.com/hunting_fishing_outdoor_use/hone-stone/
    • Firestarting kit – a bunch of bike innertube squares, lighter, fire steel You need to get rid of those smelly innertubes that don't light worth a damn in the wind and rain unless you have a VERY protected flame and replace them with firestraws.
    • Bug spray
    • Sunscreen
    • spoon
    • hank of lightweight cordage This is why I asked about the boot laces earlier. 
  • DeLorme InReach sat unit
  • Toilet paper and hand sanitizer  Don't just use the hand sanitizer on hands. It does an amazing job of keeping feet/pits/crotch stank at bay.
  • Halulite minimalist cook pot with trangia alcohol stove, windscreen, pot support, and spare fuel nested inside
  • Exped air pillow UL
  • Sunglasses
  • Couple of granola bars


On Prairie Belt:

  • (1) GI 1qt canteen
  • Binos in hpg 1qt canteen holder on opposite side from canteen
  • Spare magazine(s) for pistol
  • Pouch for spare rifle ammo that is usually empty
  • Grimloc that the gloves are often hung off of


Inside Kit Bag:

  • Pistol w/ light on it
  • Fire starting kit (same as above, but also with some GI fire starter stuff)
  • Spoon
  • purification tabs in half of a cheapo contacts container Great lower volume/profile idea!
  • 4” fixed blade knife
  • Merino beanie
  • Buffwear neck gaiter thing
  • Ear plugs
  • Couple packets of Via
  • Petzl Tikka XP 2 headlamp
  • Leather gloves
  • Couple of notecards  Why not a very small notebook? 
  • Metal mechanical pencil Ditto. Mechanical? Really? I thought you'd be more of an Old School #2
  • Phone in plastic bag case (primary GPS, basemap, reading. The GPS seems every bit as good as the foretrex unit I have as backup)
  • Paper maps (used to make my own on a per trip basis, but finding it more convenient recently to have a wide area coverage trails illustrated map instead) These are in a ziplock bag, right?
  • Camera What are you using these days?


In pockets:

  • Leatherman When was the last time you used this in the backcountry?  I ditched mine many moons ago after never needing it after many extended trips.
  • Chapstick
  • Lighter
  •  (1) AAA flashlight

 


forumPoster is not the actual poster. If you are the actual poster, please make another quick post claiming this post. Sorry, too much moderator overhead to change the attribution on this post.
 
New Post
5/17/2013 10:42 PM
 

That'd be me. - Allen

 
New Post
5/20/2013 12:33 PM
 

Good questions and tips Allen. Overall, part of the answer is that my thinking is somewhat "generalist". I don't pack on a per-trip basis. I'm always packed and don't usually do anything but check the status of the food bag before heading out. Some of the backup stuff is to give me a few days of range, whether those few days are planned or just because I'm doing back to back short trips. I often make a game day call about where I'm going to go and could end up in very different environments on the flip of a coin. That explains why I've gone away from trip specific maps in favor of just grabbing one of the battery of Trails Illustrated maps I have in the gear closet as I head out the door. If I always topped off every battery before a trip, I may not carry as many spare batteries. I guess you'd call it more of a living out of your pack mentality than a tuning for a specific trip mentality.

  • Wallet - I drive an older simpler rig. That means more reliable but also easier to steal outright even if someone doesn't take the time to look for the hide a key. I don't 100% expect my vehicle to be at the trailhead when I get back. I feel it is a less likely problem here than it was in the Cascades, but still a concern. A hidden kill switch might be an upgrade at some point. I'm also not 100% sure that I'll come out at the same TH my vehicle is parked at for whatever reason. I don't leave the wallet at home to give me flexibility and capability in interfacing with the modern world on the way to and from the TH, or just if my plans change as I'm driving.
  • Spare longie top - absolutely essential survival gear to be able to put a dry baselayer and socks on in the event of a mishap, or just having pushed a little too far. Also wear both longie tops at once from time to time.
  • Spare TP roll - 1oz of insurance and there isn't always skunk cabbage around.
  • Brush - I'm wearing my hair shorter these days, beard just as long. For 1oz, the ability to brush out matted and itchy hair / beard is really nice.
  • Bootlaces - my laces never seem to break when it is convenient. you can always re-knot, but then may not be able to tighten the way you need. the cordage I carry is very thin and would not be great for lacing boots. For half an ounce, I'll just put a brand new pair of the correct bootlaces in and drive on.
  • More stove fuel - I just added this recently and may take it back out at some point. For 4oz, not an inconsequential decision. My plan for that could just as easily be wood fires as necessary. The alcohol stove is just more convenient.
  • Woodstove - I'm always going back and forth on that, particularly in the warmer months. On one side you have comfort and safety and on the other side you have time spent messing around. I tend to move more and camp less these days. Get somewhere mid-afternoon tired and beat... instead of making camp, take a nap and then move on until a couple hours before dusk. My canister stove is way low on the "time spent messing around" side, but I chafe at the bulk of it somewhat. We'll see what happens when I've got the smaller size of our new woodstove in hand.
  • Serape -  I'm not interested in all of my insulation being in my sleeping bag. That means I'm trapped in my bag if I want to stay warm in inclement conditions and also puts all of my eggs in one basket. So whatever system I choose has to have some of my insulation in wearable components and some in the bag. That means either Serape or puffies top and bottom. I could save 0-1 pound going to puffy pants and jacket depending on which exact puffies and which generation of Serape. However, The Serape as overbag at night ends up being a whole greater than the sum of its parts in terms of warmth and comfort. Having another two layers of nice DWR treated fabric between my sleeping bag and whatever moisture might be present is also very nice. Actually has me considering down for an inner bag. When used around camp and as something to throw on when glassing (or for the aforementioned mid-afternoon nap), I find the Serape warmer and more comfortable than puffies. So, I might save some weight and still get by just fine going to puffies, but I'm getting more bang for the weight out of the Serape.
  • Gaiters - Wearing pants over gaiters gives you a shingle effect in wet weather. You'd never lay shingles on a house with the higher shingles directing moisture underneath the lower shingles. Same deal with gaiters. For postholing through snow, gaiters do go on the outside.
  • Sawyer Squeeze - I've longingly looked at the weight and bulk reduction represented by the Sawyer. Pump filters are big and heavy. Remember that this is drier country than the Cascades. Often enough, getting water means extracting it from underneath a talus field or out of a really small desert seep. Being able to pump water out of a hard to get to place is pretty important. The coarse filter on the end of the hose doesn't hurt either.
  • Redundant hydration tabs - Hydration is almost at the top of the survival list. For the weight and space of tabs, I'm going to have them stashed in several places. No downside to it.
  • GPS redundancy is because the basemap capable mobile phone isn't as robust of a device as the Foretrex backup. Thankfully, the Foretrex is a pretty small and light unit.
  • Compass - I think I have a good button compass somewhere just because you're supposed to. Might still be buried in my Kit Bag. My mobile phone also has a VERY nice compass on it with features that a manual compass could never have. All that being said, I maintain that a compass is nearly worthless unless you are good at pace count. If you are in a situation where you can see natural features well enough to triangulate your position, you don't need a compass to figure out where to go. If you can't see natural features to triangulate from, a compass won't tell you where you are. Compasses work well for moving through heavy cover from a known position to a pre-determined position... if you can accurately keep track of distance traveled, and are constantly plotting your location on a map. For me, in the kind of country I travel, it comes down to this: If I can see well enough to terrain associate, I'm good to go. If I don't know where I am because I can't identify natural features either because of no visibility or confusion, a compass won't help me -- I need a GPS. If I lived in the eastern woodlands or something where you can almost never terrain associate, I might spend the time to get good enough at pacecount to navigate primarily by compass. I'm not suggesting that a person not learn compass nav. It's a very important building block skill and one that I teach any of the kids under my charge in an outdoor situation. Just that I don't have much use for a compass.
  • Steel - I'm using a 1oz aluminum shelled version of the brass one. The diamond steel is the best thing I've found short of a Lansky (and it is quite a bit short of a Lansky) for keeping a knife sharp. For whatever reason, I have an easier time maintaining a consistent angle with a steel than with a flat stone.
  • Innertube Squares - I can keep 20+ "starts" in the form of innertube squares in the space of a pack of gum. There is no potential for disintegration in the storage container and no mess whatsoever. Wind is an issue, but I've never had a problem pushing up a hasty debris wall to block the wind out. If it really really mattered, I could pitch my shelter and start the fire inside of that.
  • Notecards - I used to use a small notebook with many of the pages removed to save on weight and bulk. This gets stored in the Kit Bag where I am very much concerned about weight and bulk. A couple notecards beats out the notebook by a fair margin.
  • Mechanical Pencil - Pencil over pen for obvious reasons. When it comes to pencils, whatever I have is going to have the lead broken off of the tip when I pull it out to use it. If a mechanical pencil, all I lost was a couple millimeters of lead and all I have to do is click the end cap a couple times to be back in business. I did use a carpenters pencil for a while, but it would still get broken tips sometimes, and couldn't write or illustrate with nearly the precision of a mechanical pencil. It does have to be a metal bodied mechanical though.
  • Maps in ziplock - Sometimes when I printed my own on regular paper instead of map paper. With waterproof TI maps, no.
  • Camera - Still the same one. Powershot SX120. I Keep trying to drop the weight and bulk of the camera, but just can't do that and get the image quality I want. I might be able to if I go to one with proprietary batteries (instead of AAs), but I haven't been willing to do that yet.
  • Leatherman - I use it every trip for stove and pot manipulation. Pot manipulation even moreso over an open fire. Occasionally I'll use it for other things, almost always the pliers. Backup knife doesn't hurt. My sideclip is only 4oz. The newer one I sometimes carry is 6oz, and also has a nice wood saw on it. Again, backup.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
5/20/2013 5:41 PM
 

I also keep my pack in the same order, usually packed for a general outing, not a specific event.  Just prior to heading out the door on an adventure, I will re-evaluate what I have in my pack and add to it, depending on the trip.  I always take my wallet and keys.  I take a level one and two top and bottom with a puffy jacket, rain jacket, hat and gloves.  Usually I have one extra pair of socks and t shirt.  I don't take a bag though, unless I know I will be out overnight when its cold.  Usually I take my bivy bag and a modified poncho liner.  That has worked for me so far, in many places so I don't figure I will change now.  I do like the abilities of a Serape though........

I don't leave chow in my pack, I am afraid of the consequences if mice get in there.  I do have it pre packed in containers in the garage so I can grab a meal or meals and head out.  I only have one map, I usually go to the same place.  I am just now gettting used to keeping my KB on my chest.  That is is different for me.  I like the difference and the options it gives me. 

I always have people laughing at me because I wear my gators under my pants, but when the day is done and they are wet and I am not, I am able to visible show them why I wear them under my pants. 

I don't carry much in the way of emergency gear.  I don't venture very far without my pack in the first place.  I also try not to do anything that will result in me needing emergency gear.  With that being said, I do have some things, but I usually use these items anyway and instead of having them stashed as emergency gear, I have it as extra useful gear.  To me, emergency gear is like saving money, nice to have, but it sucks to build it up.  I am sure I will get a ton of slack for that, but that is just the way I am.  Don't put yourself in the situation and you shouldn't have a problem.

One thing I hardly ever take is a camera, usually because I know I won't use it.  I am a horrible picture taker, and I am not thinking about taking a picture. 

 

 

 
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