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HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsHPGHPGUte Internal Frame PackUte Internal Frame Pack
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8/17/2012 8:35 PM
 

[QUOTE]scothill wrote The ute is a full internal frame pack with stays bent to your back and some other suspension features. 

 

Hills & Company,

it's been excitng to follow your progress on this pack on the Forum.  What stay lengths you think you'll be going with?  Hoping at least 24 for some solid lift.

Keep up the great work!

Ben

 
New Post
8/18/2012 4:14 AM
 

this looks very good indeed, although im very happy with my tara set up and i use my kifaru express alot aswell, think this and your back pouch will most definatly be orderd and looks like this may become my new "go to pack"  looks excellent!

 

 

 
New Post
8/18/2012 6:27 AM
 

 Ben,

24 is the gold standard for us. Anything less is chancing our pack not being big enough for most everybody. 

 
New Post
9/14/2012 7:25 AM
 

any updates on the Ute?

 
New Post
9/14/2012 10:42 AM
 

I'm in the midst of sewing the next revision right now. Hope to have it on the trail in the next couple of days.

The HPG "Prairie Belt" is already on it's way to manufacturing for production samples. Barring unforseen issues, it's finished. This is the belt that goes on the Ute, but was a major undertaking in and of itself. It will be available for sale stand alone probably before the Ute is. Here are some features:

  • designed to be used as a pack waist belt or a "battle belt" - old timers would call that a prairie belt.
  • quickly detaches from a host pack for use as a prairie belt without any extra straps dangling off of it
  • can be fit to an HPG shoulder harness as an LBE if you want. I don't prefer it that way.
  • padding is removable and changeable -- can be used without pads, with 1/4" closed cell pads, and with some fatty bombatty pads.
  • PALS goes all the way back to the edge of the lumbar.
  • the back of the lumbar has a tab and parachute cord arrangement for stashing a coat or bedroll when it isn't on a pack
  • Osprey style closure system. I call it Osprey style, but I'm not sure who started it and lots of folks use it. The only applicable patent I could find was for the Kifaru powerpull style of closure, except the inventor was a guy named Scherer (1994), and the patent assignee isn't Mountainsmith or Kifaru. The Osprey style is quite a bit different anyway.
  • has tabs in place to rig climbing style gear loops beneath the PALS
  • forward compatible for a simple alpine style 1" tubular webbing safety harness to be integrated for basic fall safety. might actually make a full climbing harness kit to go with it as well, but that's on the back burner.

My goal was for our belt to be as comfortable as Kifaru's belt, which is the best on the market. I was very surprised to find that with the 1/4" foam pads it is just as comfortable, but with the fatty bombatty ones it is noticeably more comfortable. When worn detached, the fat pads aren't optimal because they put the weight of canteens and such too far from the center of gravity. Detached, no pads is best but the thin pads are pretty good. I expect that for use on the Ute, I'll probably mostly run the thin pads myself so that it also works well detached. For heavier loads, those fat pads will get a lot of use.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
9/14/2012 11:22 AM
 

 holy toledo that sounds awesome.

I love the multi-use aspect of HPG products. The climbing harness is a solid idea and something i would be interested in. I also really like the idea of having the belt as a way to make a day-hike with kit bag, water, and jacket on the belt. Superb.

I would also venture to guess that the forthcoming HPG belt could be worn with the tarahumara? (not docked/attached, just sized to where there would likely be clearance for most people)

-GM

 

 

 
New Post
9/14/2012 11:34 AM
 

GM, The Tara rests on top of whatever you have under the paracord compression on the back of the belt. Depending on size of that item, it will transfer the weight of the Tara to the hipbelt, unweighting the shoulder straps.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
9/14/2012 12:13 PM
 

Very impressed, you guys keep knocking it out of the park as usual. I don't think I have ever been so excited about a belt before- haha

to make it clear the belt will be sold seperately from the Ute pack, correct?

 
New Post
9/14/2012 12:26 PM
 

I still have to play with our shopping cart system to figure out if I can do this, but here is the plan:

  • Prairie Belt is available separately (three sizes, by the way)
  • When purchasing the Ute, the price includes adding a belt in your choice of size and color
  • If you order a Ute, but don't add a belt to the order (because you already have one or whatever), we'll refund a certain amount

We don't know belt pricing or Ute pricing to make a determination, but the belt will probably be a little less expensive if purchased with the Ute than if you purchase it separately. The goal is to not be in the business of selling products that are incomplete. You could run the Ute without a belt, but you wouldn't really want to unless with a very minimal load. It's meant to go with a belt.

The belt should work with any pack that has twin vertical stays that are exposed at the bottom. It should also work with the "pass behind" styles of packs where you thread a belt in behind a lumbar pad that is sewn top and bottom.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
9/14/2012 1:02 PM
 

 Once again HPG never fail to impress! This take on a waist belt sounds really good, you definately have a customer here who will be buying both!

 
New Post
9/14/2012 1:18 PM
 

I am very excited about this belt, and really look forward to logging more time with it. To date, Evan has always made sure it quickly finds its way back to him quickly ;).  It corrects some serious short comings with some of the other belts on the market, and adds a new utility to, which is also missing from other belts.


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
9/14/2012 1:26 PM
 

 That's exactly what I'm looking for, I love the fact that it can be dropped from the main pack and still carry essentials, great idea, will be interesting to see how it looks set up as a battle belt with the use of the Shoulder harness.

 
New Post
9/16/2012 8:31 AM
 

 So the Ute is around 2100 cubic inches which would make it around 35 litres, would that be about right ?

 
New Post
9/16/2012 4:47 PM
 

adv wrote

 So the Ute is around 2100 cubic inches which would make it around 35 litres, would that be about right ?

Not at all actually!  I tested the last iteration, which was around 60-ish liters in the main pack. There will be options for the compression panel so the cubic capacity could fluctuate a bit as well. If you don't mind me asking, where did you get the 2100 ci from?

 
New Post
9/16/2012 6:11 PM
 

JoeHayes wrote

 adv wrote

 

 So the Ute is around 2100 cubic inches which would make it around 35 litres, would that be about right ?

 

Not at all actually!  I tested the last iteration, which was around 60-ish liters in the main pack. There will be options for the compression panel so the cubic capacity could fluctuate a bit as well. If you don't mind me asking, where did you get the 2100 ci from?

From appallingly bad maths on my part it seems. Evan had mentioned on the first page that the Ute measured 24x12x7.5 which I figured would equate to the 2100 ci or 35l. The 60 liters sounds just great and I will never attempt maths again and go back to throwing poo at passing cars.

 
New Post
9/16/2012 6:52 PM
 

adv, nothing wrong with your math. The truth is that we haven't figured out what kind of voodoo to use to get volumes that you can compare with other manufacturer's.

So far, the thing that has seemed to yield the most equivalent results is to take the dimensional capacity (the math you just did) and then multiply that number by 1.75 or 1.8. For the Ute, that gives you  a capacity of 3675-3780. That jibes pretty well with my experience with other packs that are listed in that size range.

As Joe says, the ability to add another 500 or so cubes in the form of a back pocket if you choose and then another 1000 cubes in a stuff sack on top gives you some options.

On the other hand, I've gone to great lengths to come up with a design that compresses down to day pack size really well. Not just compressed and lumpy, but compressed and squared away. The goal is to really hit that "day and a half pack" size out of the park. Great choice for a gear intensive winter day trip, great choice for a shoulder season overnighter, great choice for a light and fast summer time multi day trip. That's not an easy set of things to hit with one pack, but that's the goal.

On a side note, I just finished the most recent iteration of the Ute today. Looking forward to packing with it. I think it might be the final one.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
9/17/2012 12:08 PM
 

evanhill wrote

On a side note, I just finished the most recent iteration of the Ute today. Looking forward to packing with it. I think it might be the final one.

wooohooo!, congrats- sounds promising

maybe my math is off too, but the packbag is about 2500 ci but the Ute will be 3500ish ci? I was under the impression that the Ute was just the pack bag but with some back pockets for storage/organization- or was the Ute modeled after the L sized pack bag that was mentioned a while back?

 

 
New Post
9/17/2012 4:57 PM
 

evanhill wrote
 


 

On the other hand, I've gone to great lengths to come up with a design that compresses down to day pack size really well. Not just compressed and lumpy, but compressed and squared away. The goal is to really hit that "day and a half pack" size out of the park. Great choice for a gear intensive winter day trip, great choice for a shoulder season overnighter, great choice for a light and fast summer time multi day trip. That's not an easy set of things to hit with one pack, but that's the goal.


 

There has to be a good market for this. Like many, I get 2 days off a week and can't do an overnight every week as sometimes I have to take care of grown up things and then can only get out for a day. That means taking everything out the overnight pack and putting it in a daypack, not only a pain but stuff invariably gets left behind/forgotten. A day pack that would expand to hold enough gear for an overnighter would just make life so much easier - even if it means there's a weight penalty to pay for the daypack configuration it would be well worth it. In terms of sizing it  boils down to the capability to pack a sleep system and shelter system really.  I nearly pulled the trigger on the Kifaru frame as the frame I've been playing with hasn't worked out as I'd hoped, but I think I might wait a bit now.

 
New Post
9/17/2012 5:23 PM
 

Like many, I get 2 days off a week and can't do an overnight every week as sometimes I have to take care of grown up things and then can only get out for a day.

Great line. I'm in the business, and I can still sympathize. I'm supposed to hit the trail tomorrow for an overnighter to start putting the latest Ute through its paces. That means I should have it packed and ready to go right now. As it is, here I sit at quarter after six, still marking stuff off the to-do list with another hour or so to go before I can pack.

That scenario you mention is something I've talked about elsewhere. A pack of the Ute's size is packed with a heavy day load - basically everything you need for an overnighter minus bedroll and extra food. For a day trip, you're well outfitted and anything you don't need to be carrying is just training weight. To turn it into an overnighter, you just put your pre-packed bedroll either inside the top of the pack if there is still room, or on top of the pack under the compression straps. Bedroll consists of sleeping pad around the outside of the stuff sack with your sleeping bag and pillow shoved down into the middle. Ground cloth too if you use one. If for whatever reason you go car camping or just need to plan on crashing on a relative's floor, your bedroll is already packed and ready to go as a seperable item.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
9/17/2012 6:06 PM
 

It sound's like great pack.  Any idea when it will be available?

 
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