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4/9/2017 9:56 AM
 
I've had good luck with it....But honestly, good super glue works just as well. At least for me.
 
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4/9/2017 10:42 AM
 
Good to know, thanks. Collin - I'm still an aspiring weightlifter, and it's been a few months since I've torn a callus. I'll have to keep this in mind for whenever I do.

Ken - I hate split fingers in cold weather, normally happens around the edges of my thumbnail. I don't imagine I'll be experiencing that for a few months, but good to know its used for that.

El Mac - it's currently sitting in my kit... Right next to some crazy glue... I have to say, for the size and weight, superglue sure is nicer than this stuff.

- J
 
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4/10/2018 8:04 PM
 
Hey guys, hope im not necroing but I wanted to throw some knowledge into the pool.

1) I think most could benefit their med kit with seran wrap, chop a roll in half or a 3rd and you’ve got something great for burns specifically but with innumerable other uses aswell (takes flame, tie stuff, occlusive dressing, etc.). Whats your skin do? Keeps heat and fluids in and stuff out, things that burns compromise.

2) I notice a lot of you guys are bringing dressings or gauze which is great but without both your hurting the potential. Wound packing with quick clot gauze or plain gauze of some flavor then compressing with ace wrap or a compression dressing is the way to do it that way your applieing direct pressure from the inside-out where it counts.

3) I don’t like fancy tourniquets, seen a lot of them break or be rendered ineffective by clotting blood on the velcro... which is kinda where you need them. I also don’t like the cheap ones like the rubber strips, reminds me of junkie trash and they are weak (the people and the durability lol). I love my cravats and windlasses, multi use (splinting, slinging, cool guy bandana), effective, classic.

4) I prefer carrying a small bottle of betadine over the other stuff for wound sterilization. As long as the patient has no shellfish allergy, a little goes a long way and does the job. Take a disposable water bottle, add betadine till it looks like a weak tea, stab a hole in the lid and you can flush wounds with effect. Only downside is you can stain skin if its too potent... but never had any complaints considering.

5) Safety pins. Barring trauma or anaphylaxis most obstructions are caused by the patients tongue. You can pull their tongue out all the way and safety pin it to their cheek. Sounds shitty and if they come-to your nearly guaranteed a combative patient lol... but they’ll have an airway while your doing what needs done. The tongue heals very quickly anyway and I preferred it to oropharyngeal airways because of the gag reflex. They have plenty of other uses aswell. Nasopharyngeal are obviously better but not everyone carries those.

Appreciate all the knowledge on these forums and glad I could contribute in some way. Cheers all!

Disclaimer: Im out of the game and not a licensed medical provider, don’t do any of this, im just some crazy guy on the internet.
 
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4/10/2018 8:12 PM
 
The SOF-T tourniquets do not use velcro and don't break either.
 
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4/10/2018 9:29 PM
 

Not knocking your opinions warrior, I have no personal experience with that flavor of TQ. If you like it and trust it then thats all that matters. Cheers 

 
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3/18/2019 2:24 PM
 

You carry a Cric Kit in you backcountry FAK?!? Seriously man, if a person is in need of a surgical airway in the backcountry for any reason they're as good as dead. This isn't the sandbox, the actual percentage of anyone needing a surgical airway for anything in the woods is so close to zero/absolutely less than 0.5% chance... If a nasopharyngeal airway and positioning isn't doing the trick and you're in the woods the outcome is going to be poor. I would love to know what type of situation you think you're going to encounter to deploy such tools, as well as who's covering you from a liability and medical director route to do once of the most invasive field procedures available. 

Been flying critical care medevac as a Paramedic for 8 years and a medic for 15, currently working for a hospital base program at a Level 1 trauma center and the times in my career I have needed to resort to a surgical airway in the field is 2. Some medics go their entire career never seeing or performing one. Now I understand functioning as an 18D your patient population and injuries are different, but again we aren't talking the warzone, we are talking daily IFAK or backwoods FAK. 

I appreciate your service, but also keep in mind military world and civi world are two different animals. 18D to civi world is a national registry basic, so I would think long and hard about an open cric on anyone....

 
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3/19/2019 8:51 AM
 
ryan501618 wrote:

You carry a Cric Kit in you backcountry FAK?!? Seriously man, if a person is in need of a surgical airway in the backcountry for any reason they're as good as dead.

I appreciate your service, but also keep in mind military world and civi world are two different animals. 18D to civi world is a national registry basic, so I would think long and hard about an open cric on anyone....

Alpen didn't recommend that YOU carry a cric kit in the backcountry, he just said that HE does.  His "backcountry" is still, quite often, OCONUS.  I doubt he'd carry one on a western solo hike/hunt.

I agree the the likelyhood is extremely low, but a cric kit weighs what, 2-3oz?  You ever had to treat a fractured mandible?  Without suction?  A head smash from a rock while climbing or running whitewater could set you up for that PDQ.  You're a flight EMT-P, you intubate regularly, and have that equipment at hand, might be why you've only had two crics.  Airway algorithms start with "head-tilt, chin-lift" and end with a surgical cricothyroidotomy.  They always have, and they always will.  I went through the SF Medic course in 82, I've seen a LOT of stuff in the middle of that airway algorithm come and go.  They didn't even teach us to intubate back then, I learned later as an EMT-P.

I'm still teaching this stuff to SOF operators today.  A 6,0 ET tube, cut down with a piece of used IV tubing girth-hitched as a tie, with a pediatric bougie stored in the tube is what all the cool guys carry these days

 

 
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3/20/2019 10:07 AM
 

Fair enough, to each their own.

 
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