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HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralFine details of gear placementFine details of gear placement
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3/20/2021 5:10 PM
 

Hello hill people. How do you weigh in about this possibly new subject? Certainly the general subject is old - place the heaviest gear against the back between the hips and neck. However I would like to hear your ideas about the subject of which section of the back should hold the heaviest items. Could you make reasons or share experience to say that you prefer the neck area or the middle back area or the lower back area for the heaviest items? 

 
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3/22/2021 9:23 AM
 
The weight should be carried as close to the center of gravity and low down as possible. That means in general on your lumbar curve. Should you have a neck strong enough you could carry on the top of your head, but then you would have all the weight on the based of your spine with is poor design for carry weight. Much better to try and land the weight on two columns (your legs) rather than one (spine). Even tumplines were used to hold it forward, but the weight was on your hips by leaning forward.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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4/8/2021 8:11 PM
 
scothill wrote: happy wheels
The weight should be carried as close to the center of gravity and low down as possible. That means in general on your lumbar curve. Should you have a neck strong enough you could carry on the top of your head, but then you would have all the weight on the based of your spine with is poor design for carry weight. Much better to try and land the weight on two columns (your legs) rather than one (spine). Even tumplines were used to hold it forward, but the weight was on your hips by leaning forward.
 

Okay, that makes sense. Thanks for the answers.

 
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