By continuing you agree to our use of cookies. You are able to update your settings at any time.

Cookie Policy

A cookie, also known as an HTTP cookie, web cookie, or browser cookie, is a piece of data stored by a website within a browser, and then subsequently sent back to the same website by the browser. Cookies were designed to be a reliable mechanism for websites to remember things that a browser had done there in the past, which can include having clicked particular buttons, logging in, or having read pages on that site months or years ago.

Strictly Necessary Cookies

These cookies cannot be disabled

These cookies are necessary for the website to function and cannot be switched off. They are normally set in response to your interactions on the website e.g. logging in etc.

Cookies:
  • .ASPXANONYMOUS
  • .DOTNETNUKE
  • __RequestVerificationToken
  • authentication
  • CV_Portal
  • CV_Store_Portal_Cart_21
  • CV_USER
  • dnn_IsMobile
  • language
  • LastPageId
  • NADevGDPRCookieConsent_portal_21
  • userBrowsingCookie

Performance Cookies

These cookies allow us to monitor traffic to our website so we can improve the performance and content of our site. They help us to know which pages are the most and least popular and see how visitors move around the site. All information these cookies collect is aggregated and therefore anonymous. If you do not allow these cookies we will not know when you have visited or how you navigated around our website.

Cookies:
  • _ga
  • _gat
  • _gid

Functional Cookies

These cookies enable the website to provide enhanced functionality and content. They may be set by the website or by third party providers whose services we have added to our pages. If you do not allow these cookies then some or all of these services may not function properly.

Cookies:

Currently we are not utilizing these types of cookies on our site.

Targeting Cookies

These cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Cookies:

Currently we are not utilizing these types of cookies on our site.

HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralQuestions about huntingQuestions about hunting
Previous
 
Next
New Post
11/27/2021 9:45 PM
 
Hey HillPeople family,
I'm an anthropology student and am currently in a research methods class. I've been looking at hunting and the relationship that hunters have with the environment and the animals throughout the semester. If you guys are able, would a few of you mind answering these questions.

What draws you to this sport/lifestyle?

What is the relationship like between you and the environment/animals you hunt/see?

Would you ever stop hunting? Why/why not?

Can you share an influential experience?

Feel free to answer all or one, or none. Thank you so much
 
New Post
11/29/2021 3:51 PM
 
This is a good place to ask that question. Hopefully you will get different answers than you would on a hunting oriented forum.

I am interested in animals year around. Seeing and interacting with animals is one of the primary reasons that I hike and backpack. Knowing where they move, when they move, why they move, watching their behavior -- all very important to me.

Hunting for me is a couple of things. First, it's an important sacrament acknowledging the fact that my life - all of our lives - is only possible through the deaths of others. A visceral reminder of that every now and then is important. The meat is nice (I prefer elk meat to all other kinds), but I'm no fool. The most cost effective way to get quality meat is to go buy a side of beef from a local rancher. The second thing that hunting is for me is an extension of my year round practice of being with the animals. It's just one step further than all the photos I take.

Almost every year I swear off of hunting when I see the havoc that hordes of hunters bring to the landscape, and the stress they put on all of the animals. Some years I get so disgusted watching it during archery season that I don't even want to hunt come rifle season. But I have this ideal that I keep trying to realize -- I want to interact with animals in their natural state like I do the entire rest of the year outside of hunting season, and then take one that isn't already stressed and running scared. For that, I'm always trying to get into places where there are no other people and the animals are relaxed. That place may only exist in my childhood past at this point.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
11/29/2021 8:46 PM
 

For me, there's something sacred about being in the outdoors. While outdoors, fishing and hunting for food is not only a part of our ancestral memory, it's a pure and honest way to acquire nutrition. The entire process is ancient and true.

 


IG: TheWyldGoose
 
New Post
11/30/2021 7:15 AM
 

What draws you to this sport/lifestyle?

Speaking of GMU 113 in WA I have been fortunate to spend the best years of over half a century here. This land was clear cut more than a century ago, logging roads everywhere, mining dumped cyanide in the river, farming pesticides poisoned the environment, ranchers came in, the river was damed, poaching is a huge issue given the poverty level, meth labs propagated, I was shot at hiking up on one. Despite that we have been able to somewhat heal the land bald eagles gone for a decade and a half in the 70s 80s 90s returned, Grizzly and Wolf have been reintroduced, elk have increased while black bear white tail moose and mule deer are improving. I'm so happy this slice of land has been getting healthier for wildlife, the entire ecosystem is healing from our man made scars. I am drawn to the lifestyle to stay in tune with the ecosystem, to ensure personal choices align with its continued healing and to stay active in the fight to protect it and improve it. I also love the solitude, the raw physical beauty, the challenge of the elements and terrain, the pursuit of game, the physicality and patience required. It connects me to my grandparents spirits.

What is the relationship like between you and the environment/animals you hunt/see?

I love being in the NE corner of WA, within sight of and sometimes in CA and Idaho at anytime of year. Hunting, Camping, hiking, scouting are all intertwined none more important to me than the other. Being in the environment is the reward, I'm not a hard core hunter I am a hard core outdoors person. I need wild lands, am reliant on it for my mental and physical health, so I nurture and protect it as imperfectly as I can. To answer your direct question honestly my modern life results in destruction of wildlands more than it protects or heals it. I try my best to offset my destruction, isolate my impact, and use informed use methods while finding common ground with those that rely on extracting natural resources for a living.


Would you ever stop hunting? Why/why not?

Laws stop me from hunting, some good like no Spring Bear in GMU 113 to promote Grizzly repopulation. Some misinformed like the new state wide no Spring Black Bear hunt. That we will work to have reinstated. I will never poach or break hunting laws. I will also stop hunting when my body fails me. My belly is full fortunately, so I don't need to hunt. I would stop hunting certain areas if I felt unsafe or I was a potential danger to others due to over crowding. Finally I would stop if subjectively I deemed my impact as a hunter was too much for wildlife population regrowth and or may maintenance.


Can you share an influential experience?

My first hunt in 1977, general deer, I went with my friend and his dad. We wore long John's under cords and sweatshirts nothing purpose built, all colorful 70s style. My friends dad was frustrated at the sound our flare legged cords made, but he was good about it. We just walked slower and stayed well behind him. We saw a nice buck 500 yards away, a shot I would easily take with my modern magnum ammo and scope, but back then we had to stalk closer and lost him. The thrill of the stalk, being out in the remote wild before dawn, being with a guy I was in awe of he seemed as big and powerful as the mountains to me, that's a thrilling and proud memory that I appreciate and feel fortunate to have been invited to experience. Community, being in nature, the physicality, the pursuit, the mentoring I received, so deeply meaningful and influential in shaping who I have become.

 
New Post
12/1/2021 10:14 AM
 
I have been hunting almost all of my life, at least 60 years. For me it is about getting out into the natural world and interacting with all the facets of it on a level that goes beyond a "hike", there is purpose. It is about being part of life and death, a good life and a good death. It is about camaraderie and shared experience. Now it is mostly about memories. I hunted all of my life with my father and going out now and experiencing "the hunt" brings back everything good about my life and times with Dad. Lastly I like the meat and the feeling of providing it to myself, family and friends. Wouldn't change a thing and won't stop till I can't. Hope I have a ways to go, Dad hunted until he was 90.
 
New Post
12/1/2021 11:15 AM
 

I started hunting much later than most people where I live - I was in about 30. I really enjoyed eating venison but got tired of begging for it from hunters that I knew.  I was an avid outdoors person - lots of hiking, canoeing and camping.  Hunting was an easy transition with a low entry cost (compared to many outdoor activities).  I enjoy the situational awareness that hunting brings to hiking, as well as the great meat.

I respect the animals I hunt and realize that without human help these populations would struggle to survive.  I'm an advocate for habitat conservation and access to wild spaces for humans as well as wild populations.  

I will stop hunting if access to hunting lands is too restricted.

After I started hunting I realized that I started to slow my pace on hiking trips - that I was deliberately noticing where I was travelling through and the animals that lived there.  It made my backpacking trips richer and more meaningful.

 
New Post
12/7/2021 10:06 PM
 
Thank you guys so much, this was more than I expected and is going to help so much for my final project this semester. Thanks HillPeople Family.
 
New Post
12/8/2021 6:12 AM
 

Good luck!

 
New Post
12/13/2021 10:39 AM
 
What draws you to this sport/lifestyle?
Started hunting as a kid. We only hunted rabbit, dove and frogs. Now days it takes me back to my childhood and gets me away from the hustle and bustle of everyday living. Though not I hunt more animals than I did as a kid.

What is the relationship like between you and the environment/animals you hunt/see?
Bring in the woods is therapy to me. Trying to hunt and see animals in their environment is part of the enjoyment and fulfillment of being in their “hood “.


Would you ever stop hunting? Why/why not?
If my body prevents me from hunting I might stop but I won’t quit on my own.

Can you share an influential experience?
Every thanksgiving my dad and I would go hunt at my grandfathers before having the thanksgiving meal. I miss those days and my dad.
 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralQuestions about huntingQuestions about hunting