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HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsOut ThereOut ThereJungle Survival Training in Peru (Part 3)Jungle Survival Training in Peru (Part 3)
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4/12/2014 8:52 PM
 

 Shelter was unquestionably an important part of our stay in the Mazamari selva (jungle).  The Sinchis all slept on the ground, but would have likely slept in hammocks if they had them.  Being off the ground certainly provided a lot more piece of mind when it came to keeping the insects from eating one alive during the course of the night.

We had several different models in use there.  I used a jungle expedition hammock from mosquitohammock.com, which I am quite happy with.  No shoulder squeeze, plenty long enough, great bug netting design, and easy to pitch.  Integral rain fly, to boot.  Others had ones from Hennessy and Snugpak.  The Snugpak ones were OK....but had a few drawbacks in their design.  No fly, poor bug net design.

We also built some improvised shelters.  These are a lot of work, and only really worth it if one were forced to spend a long time out in the jungle with no other means.  Otherwise, the hammock is the ticket.

Joe's Hennessy, I believe....another good design.

I pitched my Bushcraft USA 10x10 silnylon tarp up in between our "quad" of hammocks.  Really nice to have a center section of shade, rain coverage, and a place to cook and eat in relative comfort.  Lots of different ways this tarp can be configured.  Great piece of kit, this.

Mark and his hammock.

Improvised platform shelter.  Very sturdy and pretty comfortable once complete.  That said, it was quite a construction project and took some time to build.  Thin strips of live bark were used as lashings to hold the entire thing together, along with a little notching at key spots.  No...it would not pass code.

Improvised Lean-To.

Jungle vine.  Incredibly strong...the paracord of the jungle.

A stand of the biggest bamboo I have ever seen.  A raft or small house could be built from this stuff!


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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4/13/2014 6:48 AM
 
I saw a thicket of bamboo like that in Hawaii, and once I did a lot of the stuff I have read about made sense. I messed around a bit on one with a Kershaw Outcast and they are hard and dense too.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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8/6/2014 6:10 PM
 
Great, informative post. I'm curious as to your footwear in the final picture?
 
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8/6/2014 7:37 PM
 
Those are Garmont T8 Jungle Boots, with Outdoor Research Bugout Gaiters overtop.

Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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8/7/2014 4:25 AM
 

Thanks.

After our previous conversations about hammocks, you wouldn't happen to have a picture of your Claytor you could post, would you?

 
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8/7/2014 5:59 AM
 

Nope...not handy.  There are plenty of pictures of them on the web, 'though.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsOut ThereOut ThereJungle Survival Training in Peru (Part 3)Jungle Survival Training in Peru (Part 3)