By continuing you agree to our use of cookies. You are able to update your settings at any time.

Cookie Policy

A cookie, also known as an HTTP cookie, web cookie, or browser cookie, is a piece of data stored by a website within a browser, and then subsequently sent back to the same website by the browser. Cookies were designed to be a reliable mechanism for websites to remember things that a browser had done there in the past, which can include having clicked particular buttons, logging in, or having read pages on that site months or years ago.

Strictly Necessary Cookies

These cookies cannot be disabled

These cookies are necessary for the website to function and cannot be switched off. They are normally set in response to your interactions on the website e.g. logging in etc.

Cookies:
  • .ASPXANONYMOUS
  • .DOTNETNUKE
  • __RequestVerificationToken
  • authentication
  • CV_Portal
  • CV_Store_Portal_Cart_21
  • CV_USER
  • dnn_IsMobile
  • language
  • LastPageId
  • NADevGDPRCookieConsent_portal_21
  • userBrowsingCookie

Performance Cookies

These cookies allow us to monitor traffic to our website so we can improve the performance and content of our site. They help us to know which pages are the most and least popular and see how visitors move around the site. All information these cookies collect is aggregated and therefore anonymous. If you do not allow these cookies we will not know when you have visited or how you navigated around our website.

Cookies:
  • _ga
  • _gat
  • _gid

Functional Cookies

These cookies enable the website to provide enhanced functionality and content. They may be set by the website or by third party providers whose services we have added to our pages. If you do not allow these cookies then some or all of these services may not function properly.

Cookies:

Currently we are not utilizing these types of cookies on our site.

Targeting Cookies

These cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Cookies:

Currently we are not utilizing these types of cookies on our site.

HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsVehicle Mobilit...Vehicle Mobilit...Getting Close to New Truck Time - Need AdviceGetting Close to New Truck Time - Need Advice
Previous
 
Next
New Post
7/25/2020 1:54 PM
 

Hi all,

I live in the Midwest/Great Plains and love heading to the Rocky Mtns.

I currently have a 2003 Jeep Wrangler and 1997 Ford F-350 Regular Cab gas 4x4.  Neither one would I trust on a 500+ mile trip plus I need more seats to take kids and grandkids car camping, canoeing and other adventures.

I live on a small farm which I maintain.   My truck chores include hauling my old tractor to the shop (tractor and trailer weigh about 9000lbs.) about twice a year, carrying 20-25 bales of hay about twice a year, carrying a 250 gal water tank occasionally,  and hauling 3-6 tons of gravel a year.  Currently I just have the quarry dump the gravel in the back of the F-350 but would not do that with a new truck and would probably get or rent a dump trailer to do this if I was using a new truck.

I don't plan to pull a camping or RV trailer as I prefer tent camping in the mountains.  That said, may end up pulling a trailer in the mountains once or twice a year as an incentive to get wife and adult daughters out more to the back country.

I would also like to use the truck for some light overlanding.

I may  need to use the truck to commute 40 miles one way for 6-12 months until my job situation becomes clearer.

Given all this, what is your opinion of the truck I should get?

I started out thinking I was going to get a Ram 1500 crew cab 4x4 Ecodiesel as a one vehicle does it all.  Almost closed a deal on one but then started to read all the problems people were having with the Ecodiesel engine.

Should I get a:

1/2 ton diesel

1/2 ton gas

3/4 ton diesel

or 

3/4 ton gas?

Brand and model recommendations appreciated.

Thanks!

 

 
New Post
8/10/2020 5:21 AM
 
I have a 2500 Ram Mega cab. Seats 6 with plenty of room for storage.
 
New Post
8/10/2020 9:12 PM
 

Ford F-150, 5.0 V-8.  Stay far away from a turbo if you plan to keep it.  Look at what today's F-150 will tow.  Not much different than an F-250 from 15-20 yrs ago. A Tundra would also be a consideration but they do drink gas.  My 04 Tundra with the old 4.7 gets 18mpg highway.  The 5.7's are powerful but they don't get nearly that mileage.  You only need a diesel these days if you tow constantly, like dragging a heavy work trailer/tractor around for a living.  If I envisioned a long commute like you described, I'd be tooking for a used Civic with a manual tranny.  They are always in demand but not so much right now with cheap gas.

 
New Post
8/12/2020 3:58 AM
 
Thanks Shooter and TaK.

Right now leaning toward a diesel 3/4 just for the extra capability-not that I need it regularly currently.

If I do have a long commute, I think TaK’s idea about getting a used high MPG car is a good one.
 
New Post
8/12/2020 9:49 AM
 
For a one vehicle setup for my uses it basically comes down to a Tundra or Ford F150, and both have their pluses and minuses. I went Tundra because I feel like the Toyota is a better built vehicle with better longevity. That is mainly a feel thing though as the Ford just feels kind of cheap to me. Evan is probably going with a Ford with the ecoboost as his next vehicle.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
8/12/2020 11:20 AM
 

Thanks Scott.

I'll have to take a closer look at the Tundra.    They seemed expensive and harder on fuel that the U.S. half tons but I've heard others say good things about them.

It seems like a 3/4 ton diesel gets about the same MPG as the the Tundra and costs within a couple of thousand of one but not sure if the build quality is the same.  The Toyota's unloaded "driveability" is probably better.

My family has always favored Ford trucks but around where I live now, both mechanics and a lot of farmers seem to prefer in order GM, then Ram, then Ford as a distant third.  Three mechanics that I talked to are down on Fords.  It may just be a tribal lore thing.

What advantages do you see in the F150 over the GM and Ram half tons?

 
New Post
8/12/2020 11:32 AM
 
Tundra's aren't cheap and there is really no point in buying used unless you are willing to get one with 100k miles on it, and even then the savings may not be that great. That is the biggest downside to them in my opinion from a buys stand point. The Tundra motor is an "old" motor at this point. It hasn't been updated in a number of years, and that is where the big difference in mpg comes from in my opinion. Toyota seems to hold onto motor designs for a long time once they are proven. I am not completely sold on a turbo so I still want a V8. The Tundra comes with a solid, well known, dependable V8 at the expense of more gas miles.

When ever I start to do research on diesels I quickly come to the conclusion that they are a lot heavier, and you better have a darn good diesel mechanic on hand who knows when and how to do stuff. Otherwise you might be facing a very expensive repair if you miss something. They also seem to need more big ticket maintenance repairs than gas engines do.

My personal experience with a Dodge Truck was dang poor. I know back in the day the Dodges and Chevys we had in the FS just didn't hold up to the daily use like Fords did. Fast forward to modern times for the most part when I talk to guys who are involved in maintaining fleets of vehicles they have nothing good to say about Dodges or GMs. There is one exception I know of, but pretty much everyone else says don't touch them with a 10 foot pole.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
8/12/2020 12:19 PM
 
I don't have cogent truck advice because I'm planning on keeping my 2001 F150 another five years at least, but I would second the recommendation of buying a small commuter car for the commute. I also had a list of things I wanted a truck to do and would tack on to the end "oh, and take me to Portland and back once a week."

No matter how I bent the map, it always made sense to have a second little car for the freeway drone. MIles you put on a truck are expensive miles when you start adding in MPG, tire wear, maintenence and etc.

I guess I do have one piece of truck advice: I would rather slam a very delicate part of my anatomy in a car door than buy another Chrysler product. The caveat is that's based on three vehicles from the 80's to 2001 (I'm a slow learner). It may be they've upped their game, but I don't care to find out.
 
New Post
9/9/2020 5:37 PM
 
I'm in the same boat after my 2001 3/4 ton Dodge CTD has been off and on in the shop for a year. I'll keep it, but it's past long range reliability.

Driven every make, and every size up to 2 ton, primarily diesel, except for a Toyota for personal and business use in the past.

For a diesel to make sense it needs to be in front of a trailer 3/5 days a week and worked hard. Other wise the "diesel tax" isn't worth it to echo the others in the thread here.

That puts you in half ton truck category. I love the gen 1 tundra size as a utility truck but no one want to make that any more...sigh.

I've driven probably 12 different half tons in the last two weeks across all makes and way to much research for what ever it's worth.

1/2 ton Dodges seem like glamour rigs. Flashy but prone to failure.

The GM products felt cheap and flimsy on top a good motor and transmission ( except for their 10 speed). To me, rides and handles like a rudderless boat.

That leaves f 150 or tundra.

Leave the ecoboost alone. Dual injection + turbos may work out well for many but I love reliability, that means a NA V8 for you and I. MPG in real world is over stated with these ecoboost anyways.

2018+ means the 10 speed learning transmission...learning trans seems to have worked out well for John Deere and they do drive nice in the ford, but I still thinking theyre working the kinks out for ford.

That would put you in a early model F150 5.0/6 speed or tundra. That's my current split.

Good luck right now finding a 2016/2017 F150 not from canada.

As scott said, it's pretty much not worth it to buy used toyota until you get to 100k plus. You will likely pay the "toyota tax" to buy new. You'll pay "reliability tax" at the gas pump.

The MPG spread between them seems significant but consider gallons per 1000 miles rather than MPG and you may not be so shocked.
 
New Post
9/12/2020 3:33 AM
 
Thanks Timber! Your comment on top of what everyone else said pushed me toward the F150.

Test drove one yesterday with my bride and I liked it. Looking at trying to get a 2020 XL (work truck) crewcab with 6.5’ bed and FX4 off-road package. The nearest I could find one is about 500 miles away.

It seems like in my county, Chevrolet dominates the truck market with Ram second. Three mechanics I talked to really were down on Fords. Not sure why, maybe just some kind of local thing.
 
New Post
9/12/2020 4:22 AM
 
Follow up questions:

How important is a FX4 package on a F150 for moderate overlanding?

How hard or easy is it to add skid plates to an F150?

What skid plates are needed for moderate overlanding?
 
New Post
9/26/2020 7:50 PM
 
I went through this recently and bought a gas f250. Part of my decision was made for me when I found a really good deal on one. If your buying a f150 be sure to find a 5.0. I looked under at least 15 used ecoboosts and every one of them had a major oil leak most with less than 30000 miles. I had a Tundra and loved it but the payload capacity is just too low. I use a rooftop tent and by the time you put the tent, a camper shell, spare water and camping gear plus me and my family you are out of payload. I drove a Tacoma lime that for a short amount of time but before I put 35000 miles on it the suspension started making noises like it was failing. Part of that is my fault. My 4door long bed TRD off-road only had 900 lbs of payload. I was regularly over 1200 lbs and wheeling fairly hard.
 
New Post
9/28/2020 4:38 PM
 

Interesting coincidence.  In my current hunt for a truck, my leading candidate has gone from ecodiesel Ram, to gas Silverado/Sierra, to gas F150, to diesel 3/4 ton, to gas F250.

Was told by the local equipment rental place that they would not rent me an equipment trailer and skid steer or mini excavator unless I had a 3/4 ton or better to pull it away. This caused me to look at 3/4 tons again.

In looking more, I found I would pay as much for a F150 equipped with the capability options (snow plow prep, locking rear axle, trailer tow equip. etc.) I wanted would cost as much as a F250 XL.

Diesel seems expensive to buy and maintain.  But the showstopper for me with diesel was the reports that with the current generation of diesels there seem to be a lot of expensive component failures on both sides of 100,000 miles.

So a gas F250 is now my main candidate.  I don't like the MPG penalty I will pay but it is what it is...the least bad option. 

 
New Post
10/31/2020 7:03 PM
 

Hello all

OP here.  Ended up going with a 2020 gas Ram Tradesman 2500 crew cab 4x4.  Could not find a  F250 equipped the way I wanted it for a price I was willing to pay.

The RAM has the snow plow prep, anti spin rear axle, shift on the fly 4x4, 4:10 differential, engine block heater, spray in bed liner.  Probably more a farm truck than an overland truck but should give me all the capability I need for around our rural place but also be big enough that we can throw all our camping gear in the back and five folks in the cab and be set for a week of car camping in the Rockies.

MPGs at 600 miles on the odometer is only 13,2 ish in rural driving (55 mph) not many stops.  I hope it gets better but it is what is...

Too much tech and power stuff... Concerned the truck will be much more fragile than the 1997 Ford F350  it is replacing.  All the trucks seem to have all the power and tech stuff on them now.  Time will tell.

 
New Post
2/14/2021 2:37 PM
 
... and I just ended up with a Gen 1 Tundra as my "new" truck. It oughta last 10 years with good care. If it lasts 5, I'm ahead of the game. As someone earlier said, it's a really unique and useful size that nobody makes any longer.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
2/19/2021 8:15 PM
 
evanhill wrote:
... and I just ended up with a Gen 1 Tundra as my "new" truck. It oughta last 10 years with good care. If it lasts 5, I'm ahead of the game. As someone earlier said, it's a really unique and useful size that nobody makes any longer.

 

 

Congrats.  What year?  Mine's a 2004 Access Cab.  How many miles?  You do know about the timing belt issue?.  That 4.7 V8, apart from needing to service the timing belt every 90,000, just might be the best small-block V-8 ever made.  Scotty Kilmer (youtube mechanic) says he has no personal knowledge of ANY 1st gen Tundra that had to have its transmission repaired.

 

 
New Post
2/22/2021 5:13 AM
 
Take-a-knee wrote:

Congrats.  What year?  Mine's a 2004 Access Cab.  How many miles?  You do know about the timing belt issue?.  That 4.7 V8, apart from needing to service the timing belt every 90,000, just might be the best small-block V-8 ever made.  Scotty Kilmer (youtube mechanic) says he has no personal knowledge of ANY 1st gen Tundra that had to have its transmission repaired.

Thanks! 2002 Access Cab. 215k miles. It goes in the shop this week for a complete front end and suspension rebuild, timing belt, and rear differential rebuild to include a detroit true trac. I also scored a used color matched ARE topper with side lift gate, carpet, and factory cargo tracks with cross bars. It's coming together for sure.

 


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
2/22/2021 10:01 PM
 

Evan, you probably know the lower ball joints are a potential failure point.  DO NOT buy Moog or anything but OEM Toyota parts.  I'd do the same for the timing belt.  Congrats on the topper score.  I've looked for a year and I'm about to buy a new one.  The True Trac sounds like the way to go.  If you ever get an emissions code, change the gas cap and get someone to smoke test the gas tank vent lines.  Mine had a tiny enough leak to trip a code.  Truck ran fine as it was but I didn't like not having a functional check engine light

 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsVehicle Mobilit...Vehicle Mobilit...Getting Close to New Truck Time - Need AdviceGetting Close to New Truck Time - Need Advice