Hill People Gear Forums
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsHPGHPGExternal frame packExternal frame pack
Previous
 
Next
New Post
3/19/2018 9:21 PM
 

Been waiting for years and very disappointed this never happened. 

 
New Post
3/20/2018 6:21 AM
 
bedgood42 wrote:

Been waiting for years and very disappointed this never happened. 

Us too

 


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
3/20/2018 7:15 AM
 
We are still working on it and the stove, and the other project. Metals is a tough nut to crack.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
3/28/2018 7:21 PM
 

What sort of properties (besides weight) are you looking for?  
Guys who build experimental aircraft have all kinds of solutions, options.  (I attend EAA in Oshkosh, WI regularly and every sort of extruded metal you can think of is on display)
I can ask around, put my engineering hat back on.   But if I was looking for frame material that is light weight, etc. I'd start looking at what guys who build homebuilt aircraft are using/selling.  Seen some tubing that was oval shaped as well, super light, oriented the right way, could flex where you need and be ridiged where you don't need it.

 
New Post
3/30/2018 11:57 AM
 
I am interested in a plastic external frame pack, like the Outdoorsmans pack with your belt. In fact, as soon as the coyote Prairie Belts are in stock (fingers crossed) I am going to make a mash up with my Outdoorsmans pack. My plan is to have it done in August so I can test it a bit before elk season opens at the end of September/October.

So, about those coyote Prairie Belts...

Please and thank you.
 
New Post
3/30/2018 12:00 PM
 
I am not aware of any plans to do coyote Prairie Belts. As always if you are interested in something emails us and let us know.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
3/30/2018 2:54 PM
 
What's the advantage of an external frame pack? Load carriage requirements are defined by the ability to put the weight into the lumbar/pelvis, correct? If a pack does that efficiently, what's the difference between external and internal frames from a functional perspective?

I just got my Ute and it is *sooooo* much more comfortable with 70 lbs than the high-end external frame pack I ordered literally hours before I discovered HPG. That other pack is starting to look like a very expensive mistake...
 
New Post
3/30/2018 3:25 PM
 

I sent the email already!

 
New Post
3/30/2018 3:51 PM
 
For me, the advantage of the external frame pack, and specifically the Outdoorsman's frame, is the flex built into the frame material plus the ability to lash bloody game bags to the frame and not have my main pack bag soaked in blood. Blood washes out to be sure, but it is a safety concern when hiking in areas with other apex predators. Also, after my first trip out, I leave the bag behind at the trailhead/truck, and just hike meat on the remaining laps, with just a palspocket carrying emergency and water supplies. The external frame also allows me to lash waterproof/dry bags on instead of a main bag, if I know it will be a wet adventure. There are pros and cons to both, and sometimes, load carriage is not the only factor in a mission. The external frame excels at some tasks and an internal frame excels at others. The best of both worlds is the Outdoorman's frame with the HPG Prairie Belt. The Outdoorsman's belt lacks sufficient padding when the loads top 85lbs, and the padding in the belt squeaks with almost every step when walking under heavy load, which is not ideal in a hunting pack...and even after the kill, when sound control isn't as important, the squeaking drives me crazy (er). When I am not worried about blood, hiking meat out, or days of rain and moisture, the HPG packs are a dream.
 
New Post
3/31/2018 5:16 PM
 
Not as many people need externals as think they do. Mtndragon mentions some cases where an external could be helpful.

Really, the biggest difference is that an external frame allows you to "unitize" a sloppy or ungainly load so it can be efficiently landed in the lumbar. Even with an internal that has good compression, the user has to use a little bit of expertise to properly unitize the load. The other difference is that I couldn't manage to make an internal any wider than 12" without starting to get some rounding during unitizing (compressing). Externals are mostly 14" wide. That gives you a whole lot more volume from the get go.

None of the externals on the market that I'm aware of do a good job of landing the load in the lumbar. So you're better off with one of our internals than any of the externals. An external that actually lands the load in the lumbar (which my design does in a way that none ever has) is a killer setup for backcountry freighting.

I Beam - design and material choices aren't the hold up, reliable production is. Plus, there's always a marriage of design and a production facility's capabilities. It's not like CAD parts where one guy's production capability is pretty much the same as another's.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
4/2/2018 9:43 PM
 
Thanks for the replies. I have dreams of extended backcountry expeditions, but realistically I think the Ute will take me farther than I'll be able to go any time in the near future. I'm intrigued by the external pack now, though, as a study in design and engineering, if nothing else.
 
New Post
4/2/2018 11:22 PM
 

I've got a coyote prarie belt if you want send me a e-mail here: olesfjason@gmail.com

 
New Post
6/21/2018 10:30 PM
 
Dear HPG,
I recently bought a Mystery Ranch Mule for hunting, and longer-range backpacking. The hauling, especially meat hauling, capabilities are gonna be great!

However, after being around your products for a number of years I can't help but say "what were they thinking?" On several design aspects of the Guide Light Frame. So let me just say again with the chorus of others:

HPG, PLEASE do an external soon!

Thank you,
The common citizen
;)
 
New Post
6/22/2018 11:35 AM
 
I hope to an external soon! I've been so close to buying a kifaru or exo mountain gear frame but always hold off hoping a HPG external will be coming.
 
New Post
6/26/2018 2:50 PM
 
I don't think the Mule (or Kifaru/Exo) are real external frame packs. Those companies consider them to be internal frame packs that just have the load shelf capability. It's literally exactly what I've been hoping for from HPG for a few years now, but I'm sure there is a reason that they haven't done it yet. The footprint of the Mule (and the Exo and several Kifaru options) are exactly what I look for in a pack for hunting season. Reasonably sized but not overly sized bag (1800-2200 is perfect day hunt size in my opinion), heavy load carry capability for quarters, and a good frame/suspension system. I've owned an Exo (although don't currently) and they fit the bill quite nicely. However, my one HUGE complaint with them is that there is limited adjust-ability compared to HPG. It's a "one size fits all" internal stay system, and after using stays that I have been able to form fit to my own back it's just hard to be happy with something that isn't customized. Kifaru is much better than Exo in that regard, as they do some customization based on your back profile, and you can order aluminum stays that you can bend a bit on your own as well. I also think their quality is very high, much more in line with HPG than what Exo currently offers in my opinion.

Like everyone else, I'd love to see the HPG external come to life. Or would love to see them improve upon the design that others are using with the internal frame pack and a load shelf between the stays and the bag. If either of those become a reality I will be in line with money in hand the first day they are available.
 
New Post
6/26/2018 2:53 PM
 
Shrubjr,
Since you have the MR Mule, can I ask what your complaints with it have been thus far? Any type of review would be appreciated. It's in the range of packs that I'm currently considering as my day hunt go-to option.

Thanks
 
New Post
6/26/2018 3:03 PM
 
The external is still on the list, but keeps slipping mostly due to working with different methods of manufacturing and thus changes in design to address those. It is very much a learning process, what folks say they can do, they can't always do, and materials that seem to be available aren't really.

That being said, you guys know you can use the Ute or qui-Ya exactly like you are talking about with the addition of an exterior pocket right? The bag will run fully collapsed and then you use the pocket as the compression panel. Any doubt about load capacity should be dispelled by the video of Evan carrying a 200lb+ rock on a qui-Ya that way. Personally, I line my pack bag with a contractors bag and just put the meat in there, I always bone out, and then just compress from there. I am obviously going to be biased, but I think the qui-Ya is the best hunting pack on the market right now if you want to haul meat out.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
6/26/2018 3:36 PM
 
Definitely aware of the option, and leaning towards finally trying it that way this year. I've been resistant in the past, but figured I have to give it a shot to really say I gave it a fair shake. And full disclosure, I've used a Qui-Ya on multiple backpack trips and just for training where I've loaded 60+ pounds and carried it a couple miles. The load carriage is definitely legit, no arguing that. Problem for me is that I can't fit a day hunt worth of gear into one of the existing pockets. MAYBE the Connor, but I tend to carry a fair amount of emergency gear where I hunt and it takes up a decent amount of room. Honestly, the Umlindi is the perfect amount of space for me for a day hunt. That 2000 cu in seems to be my sweet spot to get my food, water, kill kit, clothing, emergency gear, and few other things that I "need". So because of this, with existing pocket options I'd have to run some of my gear in the main bag, which isn't a huge problem.

I've always just had a bad feeling about running meat in the main bag. Blood soaking your other gear, or soaking into the pack and it forever smelling like bloody meat could be a problem for multiple reasons. I also like to keep some bones for use in the kitchen, so I don't always bone out meat, and packing quarters is a different issue all together in regards to how they fit on/in a pack. But that's where I plan to test it this year.Thinking of testing it with the Ute rather than the Qui-Ya since I won't need the immense bag space and having a bit lower frame height could be helpful in hunting situations. Most likely will run as much gear as I can in a pocket, the remaining gear in the main bag, and then will try it with quarters between the two..as long as I don't talk myself into trying something different with a dedicated meat shelf.
 
New Post
6/26/2018 3:44 PM
 
I have never had a problem with blood when I used a contractors bag. The nice thing is you just pull them out and throw them away when you are done with them. I have a roll in the kitchen anyway so grabbing another one or two to put in my kill kit is not a big deal to me at all. In your case I would just put the "stuff" in the bottom of the pack, then the meat in a bag above. Heck, I have done that too in the past with no issue as well. The Connor is definitely our biggest pocket. Another thing I have done is carried along our larger stuff sacks to strap lighter stuff to the sides of the pack once meat was in the pack. It makes things a bit wider, but given I am talking about puffies/serape/raincoat and that kind of stuff it doesn't weight a ton.

Honestly, I am not sure I am willing to carry, or should be carrying, enough weight to make the external worthwhile even if we had one. As I tend to bone out, my load is not awkward, which is the other reason for an external.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
6/26/2018 4:18 PM
 
Good call on the stuff sack. I've got one of yours that doesn't see much use, but could easily throw it in for some added relief on a pack out. I'll keep that in mind for this fall.

Assuming I'm lucky enough to fill tags, i'll try getting a quarter into the main bag with a contractor bag liner. If it doesn't work I'll compress it between the bag and pocket and then will add the bone free cuts inside the bag utilizing the method you mentioned. Should be a good test. Thanks for the tips
 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsHPGHPGExternal frame packExternal frame pack