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10/29/2012 9:47 PM
 

I'd love to have an really good one for ice fishing and taking upon the area above my house.  They come in like 6' ft to the smaller ones. 

 

What's better, shorter or longer?

 
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10/30/2012 2:56 PM
 

width seems to be the critical dimension for breaking trail. once you've consigned yourself to a certain width, longer just gives you more surface area and floats the load better. the sleds we're using (sourced from ACE, check the Free Resources | Pulk Instructions page) are 5 feet long.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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10/30/2012 7:31 PM
 

Gots to get me one as my old jet sled is wearing out on the bottom.  So an good long and narrow unit looks like it might be the ticket.

 
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12/3/2012 5:22 PM
 

I just stumbled across the recommended Pelican sled at a local sporting goods store in Washington.  This sled was labeled "Pelican Snow Trek 60" and cost was approximately $45 US.  The sku # is: 7 7632450547 6.  The store is (or used to be) affiliated with Ace Hardware.

 
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12/22/2012 7:09 PM
 

 I just posted some photos and descriptions on some of the Pulks and Traces I use on 24 Hour Campfire.

 

Here is a link:

http://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php/topics/7216896#Post7216896

 
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12/23/2012 5:38 PM
 

I love this photo. I searched for years for a pulk that would properly fit in a deeply trenched ski trail. Seems you have to go back to the originals. This one's a double-ender. The ones you ride in are wider and have an angled transom for your back. Once I'm back down to two or three dogs, I'll build one of these.

http://www.arcticphoto.co.uk/results.asp?image=SJM0002-35

 
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9/30/2013 9:52 PM
 

 Has anyone seen these sleds? Looks like possibly a good option for a ready to go setup...

http://luckybums.com/cargosled.aspx

it looks like they sell ready-made traces with loops on each end as well.

 
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10/1/2013 10:01 AM
 

I am going to have to order some of those traces. Sleds look nice too.


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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10/1/2013 10:18 AM
 

 I will be interested to hear your impression of them. They are listed as "adjustable length" and near as I can tell, they appear to have a mechanism similar to a twist-lock trekking pole. Should be stout enough as long as you keep it tight. What really intrigues me though is the nice neat loops on each end. 

 
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10/3/2013 9:57 AM
 
I made my own out of a kids sled bought from a hardware store. I spray glued a foam pad the length and width of the sled into the floor of it just in case my kids needed to ride on the way out of the woods from a long day snow shoeing. I put three eyelets up front, mostly because I continually messed around with the way I wanted to drag it. I have settled on using two points of contact on the sled and one on me. I have a harness that I wear and I use a nylon type tow rope (rated to 9500lbs) as the way to drag it. The tow rope is connect to my harness via a unique carabiner and then it connects to the sled via a locking carabiner to two pieces of 18" tubular nylon pieces that are anchored to the eyelets with a carabiner. So far so good. I need to add more eyelets down each side to allow me to run rope or attach bungee straps to cover things. The best part was that I spent roughly $30 for this set up and it works really well. Going downhill was tricky at first, but now I have that figured out so there aren't too many issues. The sled came with pre punched holes evenly spaced along the front and sides so now all I need to do is put eyelets in. I just used a washer on each side to dissipate stress and so far so good. I have pulled it will loads reaching 200lbs with no real issues in both snow and grass.
 
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10/18/2013 2:03 PM
 
So what's the honest assessment of the best sled for someone trying to keep the price down? I am looking at Paris as a top end and am struggling to find a source for Pelican 60s or others. I heard the Pelicans are both good and bad for pulling behind shoes or skis depending on who I talk to. Are the 60s really not that good for deep snow/powder or is it just a matter of loading them right? Seems to be the choice around here...
 
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10/18/2013 3:39 PM
 

I had a Paris Expedition sled, and it liked to roll a bit too much for my liking/terrain. For carrying capacity and stability, I would say get a pelican 60 if you can find it, or possibly look for a jet sled at Cabelas or Sportsmans Warehouse. All of these sleds can be modified to suit your needs. For the absolute cheapest traces, roll with PVC pipe, ropes, and caribiners and call it good. The pre-made traces offered at skipulk.com would be good. I made my own traces similar to those offered at skipulk, and it was kind of a pain, though it may have saved a little money in the end.

I can carry more of a load with more stability in a pelican 60 because it's deeper and wider. The Paris sled might carry a small load alright, as long as you don't load it too high.

I think the reason some folks don't like the pelican is because of width- this contributes to a bit more drag, but not much IMO. If you are skiing in tracks or on groomed trails, it's usually wider than the groomed area, which sometimes rubs people the wrong way. Most of my snow travel is off-trail, so that's not an issue. 

 
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10/21/2013 11:52 AM
 

stoutside wrote
So what's the honest assessment of the best sled for someone trying to keep the price down? I am looking at Paris as a top end and am struggling to find a source for Pelican 60s or others. I heard the Pelicans are both good and bad for pulling behind shoes or skis depending on who I talk to. Are the 60s really not that good for deep snow/powder or is it just a matter of loading them right? Seems to be the choice around here...

Pelican sleds seem to be a VERY seasonal item, in that they are only available from when snow flies until they are sold out. I don't even know if they are in production the rest of the year. I haven't seen them show up locally yet.  I personally like the Pelican 60 a lot, but loading is critical. You don't want to overload, and definitely want to keep weight low. I also weight the rear of the sled just a bit more to keep the nose up. I have seen some very high dollar sleds, and I am not sure I would take one over my pelican. We keep threating to make a top cover for them, but have just never gotten around to it.


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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10/21/2013 12:00 PM
 

Pelicans are pretty much only available from ACE hardware stores. As of a winter or two ago they had a BUNCH (450+) of them in their warehouse. They were still selling them for the $40 price. If you go online and look at them on Pelican's website, they are closer to $150. There is more information on this page about the ACE Sku so you can order one in to your local ACE:

http://www.hillpeoplegear.com/FreeResources/PulkInstructions/tabid/806/Default.aspx


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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12/4/2013 12:05 PM
 

Are local Ace (haven't been in the other ones) have sleds in right now if anyone is looking.


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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12/24/2013 3:55 PM
 
Just picked up one (finally) from a local Ace to make a poor man's pulk. They ordered it in from the warehouse and had it in store in less than a week. Cost was $45. As mentioned, very seasonal item. Once snow starts to fall, they get pressed out.

Anyone bothered with the optional traces? I looked at them but didn't think the additional weight justified my intended usage (playing the mule in snow).

Any tips on gluing down a sleeping pad to the bottom?

Thanks
 
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12/29/2013 11:01 PM
 

 I used. 3M spray glue. It seemed to work just fine, spray a healthy layer. 

 
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2/3/2014 6:03 PM
 

 Scot and I got onto the subject of pulks / akios the other day during a conversation, and I mentioned that I had an idea about building one that I could travel with that would be light, but would have removable runners and collapsible traces, that I could put into a ski bag along with skis and snowshoes for a plane ride.  So, I built one this weekend and it turned out pretty good.  I've seen plenty of examples made from high-end (and pricey) UHMWPE to re-purposed deer sleds.  I originally intended to build mine out of a roll-up kid's sled, but upon inspection, they seemed too flimsy and also too short.  I ended up building mine out of a Pelican Mega Snow Glider that I already had on hand, along with some buckles / plastic gear hardware that I had, and some items purchased from Lowe's.  

I cut the gunnels off of the Pelican sled, and then took my heat gun to it to flatten out the plastic.  I then trimmed it into the shape I wanted.

I made removable runners out of aluminum bar stock and secured them to the pulk with 10-24 stainless screws, thick rubber washers, fender washers, and wingnuts.

Then I installed large grommets at key locations on the pulk.  I then used webbing from cam straps I had on hand with double adjustable side release buckles, ladder locks, Grimloks, etc. to create the cross straps and fore-aft straps.  I removed the heavy metal cam buckles and hooks with my angle grinder and a cutting wheel.

I then made collapsible 6' traces out of standard 3/4" plastic conduit.  I also made a rigid removable cross bar for the front end out of a 10" piece of 3/4" plastic tube, to keep the pulk from collapsing into the center during a pull and turns.  Finally, I used a piece of closed cell foam gym mat as a non-slip base and secured that to the pulk with rivets and finishing washers.

The whole thing, including all straps and the traces, weighs 7 pounds.  It measures out to 4' long (with the tip and tail up in operating position) and 1' wide.  Plenty big enough to allow me to bring along just about anything I'd need for a winter backcountry trip....SO-6 Tipi, Shepherd stove, bulky cold weather gear, etc.  It rolls up into a fairly compact package, easily carried in a ski bag, or even a travel duffel for a plane ride.

I placed my loaded Ute and a fully stuffed HPG 915 bag on it and strapped them in to check capacity.  Still plenty of room to go up and out a bit, and on either end.  I intend to keep what I carry low and longer, versus high and shorter, in order to keep the pulk from wanting to tip over during a traverse and to let it track better.  During an actual trip, waterproof bag(s) will hold the gear in the pulk.

I built it pretty robust, so it will get a test at the end of the month during a Bushcraft / Survival week that my colleagues and I are running for the folks I work for, as long as there is still some snow.  Once March rolls around, it'll get a real test out at the HPG Winter Gathering (Can't wait!!).  

Check out the pics.  Hope this helps out any others out there who are interested in building their own!  Any questions are welcome, as always.

Sláinte!

Ken


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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2/3/2014 6:29 PM
 
! 

 Nicely done. I always look forward to your posts, since I first read your Umlindi review. Thanks for sharing. 

 
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2/3/2014 6:36 PM
 
Re: ! 

praharin wrote

 Nicely done. I always look forward to your posts, since I first read your Umlindi review. Thanks for sharing. 

Thanks much!


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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