By continuing you agree to our use of cookies. You are able to update your settings at any time.

Cookie Policy

A cookie, also known as an HTTP cookie, web cookie, or browser cookie, is a piece of data stored by a website within a browser, and then subsequently sent back to the same website by the browser. Cookies were designed to be a reliable mechanism for websites to remember things that a browser had done there in the past, which can include having clicked particular buttons, logging in, or having read pages on that site months or years ago.

Strictly Necessary Cookies

These cookies cannot be disabled

These cookies are necessary for the website to function and cannot be switched off. They are normally set in response to your interactions on the website e.g. logging in etc.

Cookies:
  • .ASPXANONYMOUS
  • .DOTNETNUKE
  • __RequestVerificationToken
  • authentication
  • CV_Portal
  • CV_Store_Portal_Cart_21
  • CV_USER
  • dnn_IsMobile
  • language
  • LastPageId
  • NADevGDPRCookieConsent_portal_21
  • userBrowsingCookie

Performance Cookies

These cookies allow us to monitor traffic to our website so we can improve the performance and content of our site. They help us to know which pages are the most and least popular and see how visitors move around the site. All information these cookies collect is aggregated and therefore anonymous. If you do not allow these cookies we will not know when you have visited or how you navigated around our website.

Cookies:
  • _ga
  • _gat
  • _gid

Functional Cookies

These cookies enable the website to provide enhanced functionality and content. They may be set by the website or by third party providers whose services we have added to our pages. If you do not allow these cookies then some or all of these services may not function properly.

Cookies:

Currently we are not utilizing these types of cookies on our site.

Targeting Cookies

These cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Cookies:

Currently we are not utilizing these types of cookies on our site.

HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsFirearms and Sk...Firearms and Sk...Muzzle Loader HuntingMuzzle Loader Hunting
Previous
 
Next
New Post
3/26/2014 12:51 PM
 

I have to put in for my draws by next Tuesday so this is a bit last minute.  Evan is bow hunting this year, and I was leaning that way, but not sure because I am just not sure I will be able to commit the time to practicing enough between now and then.  The bow tags are over the counter so I wasn't really planning on doing a draw just wait and see if I got to the point I felt confident to cleanly take an animal. with a bow The reason for the bow preference is that it gives us a longer season with fewer folks out and about.  Someone mentioned muzzle loading season this last weekend and I have been doing a bit of research. Turns out that muzzle loading is twice as long as rifle seasons and during the bow season.  I am confident in my shooting.  The downside is I need to put in for a draw so time is now tight.  Years ago I won a Lyman .54 Trade Rifle, and shot the crap out of it years ago as it was my prairie dog rifle.  It is very accurate and I still have a lot of the stuff to actually shoot it except powder. Reading the regs it is a legal rifle.  About all I would need to do is clean it, and start shooting it. Probably put on a different set of sights, but that is all.  Is there something I am missing or should be aware of when it comes to muzzle loading hunting?


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
3/26/2014 1:42 PM
 
If you are familiar with the rifle, I would say go for it. You didn't indicate if it was flint or percussion, or if the twist was suited to patched ball or bullets. A .54 with full.loads is powerful enough, even with round ball. Years ago I had a Cherry Corners flinter .54 with 40-inch barrel and 66" twist of rifling. I usex patched ball with 120 grains of FFg and killed moose, black bear and deer with it. I used a half-charge of 60 grains for small game and did manage to kill a small whitetail with the "half-load" although the full 120- grain charge was far more impressive, and within 50 yards killed as well as a modern rifle, with a velocity approaching 2000 fps.
 
New Post
3/26/2014 1:55 PM
 

I have no idea on twist or ball weight. I just always shot what Dad bought. I have a bunch left in storage that I can pull out to see what I used previously. I have shot it plenty with both 60 grains of powder and 120grs of powder.  It is percussion, and I shot it primarily with cloth patches, but did shoot some ball without just because. Back in the day I was able to connect with PDogs out to 75 yds without any issue. 


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
3/27/2014 8:33 AM
 

Scot the learning/refreshing curve for a muzzleloader is short and you should have no problems. Even starting from scratch I would think you could get comfortable with it faster than honing proficiency with a bow since it is still "rifle" shooting. I'd go for it.

 
New Post
4/17/2014 9:06 AM
 

 Scot,

 

The Lyman is a 1-48" twist.  In a .54 caliber, that's a "compromise" twist; it's not a slow twist for specifically roundballs (like a 1-66" or 1-72" would be), and it's not a fast twist specifically for heavy conicals (like a 1-32" would be).  In theory, and in practice, it should shoot either the roundballs or the conicals decently well, and certainly well enough for most hunting purposes.  If you can hit prairie dogs with it (though, with a .54, it's about like grenades on them: close counts), you'll be fine on big game.

I haven't shot an elk with a muzzleloader, but I do know that the T/C Maxi-Hunters and the Lyman Great Plains bullets for the .50 and the .54 work incredibly well on deer, including full-length penetration.  They should be fine in the .54 for elk, as would the patched roundball, frankly.

What you are going to need to do with conicals in that twist, though, is kick them out hard.  Think 110+ grains of powder hard.  The roundballs could well be the opposite (as in 70 grains of powder), but I've seen them work just as well with a heavy charge in '48" twists, too.

For powder, I'd run FFg or FFFg real black powder.  The substitutes don't ignite nearly as well or as consistently in a standard percussion gun, and they are just as corrosize.  Pure black gives you great consistency, almost no spread in velocity, very consistent and positive ignition, and as long as you clean it, you'll have no problems.

If for some reason you have a hard time finding .54 conicals, let me know.  I probably have some stashed away somewhere.

 
New Post
4/19/2014 2:30 PM
 

Great info, I appreciate it.  I decided to see if I drew the tag before really getting into it, and the first thing I will do is assess what all I have.  I did shoot enough other stuff to know that the rifle groups plenty good for hunting uses. 


Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
4/20/2014 3:02 PM
 
I used to hunt an awful lot with an 54 cal muzzleloader carbine in the 80's when we had an long liberal season here. If I remember correctly I believe I have the moulds for the 54 cal round ball and Maxi hunter bullet. All I can remember is elk and deer dropping on the spot when hit with all that lead.
 
New Post
4/20/2014 4:30 PM
 
oldpinecricker wrote
I used to hunt an awful lot with an 54 cal muzzleloader carbine in the 80's when we had an long liberal season here. If I remember correctly I believe I have the moulds for the 54 cal round ball and Maxi hunter bullet. All I can remember is elk and deer dropping on the spot when hit with all that lead.
You want to sell that .54 ball mould?
 
New Post
4/21/2014 12:18 PM
 

 I have been putting some thought into this as well.  

If starting from scratch what would be some of the more practical/pragmatic muzzle loader options?  How would a TC Encore with 209 x 45 or 50 barrel compare with a dedicated inline or modern muzzle loader?

Our only restriction with muzzle loaders is that it can’t use smokeless powder and can’t have over a 4x scope.

How does the 45 stack up to the 50 or 54cal in in-line or modern muzzle loaders?

Suggestions?


Talk is cheap...lets compare fur checks.
 
New Post
4/21/2014 4:43 PM
 

Scott, I've got some of 54 cal great plains bullets that I'll never use.  Three boxes or packages of them I think.  Perhaps some round balls as well.  The bullets are pre lubed.  If you want them shoot me an address and I'll send them off next week.  I'm not working and I'm in the process of Spring clear out.

 
New Post
4/21/2014 6:49 PM
 
If you want to try casting your own, I have a mold for .54 Maxi balls which I no longer use. I'd be happy to send it to you, or if you don't cast, I could run a few bullets from it and send you some to try.
 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsFirearms and Sk...Firearms and Sk...Muzzle Loader HuntingMuzzle Loader Hunting